John Tory’s SmartTrack flaw gains attention.

As reported here in WestonWeb several days ago, John Tory’s campaign team may be suffering from a bit of an embarrassment with regard to his promise of 10 km of rail line along Eglinton for an above ground subway. The problem is that the corridor Mr. Tory thinks is reserved for transportation no longer exists.

Read about it here.

Transit Plans – 1. John Tory

The top four Mayoralty candidates have released their transit plans. This is the first of a four-part series assessing these plans.

In a nutshell, current front-runner John Tory believes that above-ground subway lines are the best way to go. He proposes a line following GO train tracks where possible that will run across the city from east to west, passing through Union Station.

London has many of these – in fact 52% of London’s subway network is above ground. London has been building subways since the early 1860s – nearly a century before Toronto opened its first line.

Unlike London where new above-ground subways have been able to take over existing but unused railway lines, Toronto has no such advantage. New tracks must be added to current ones and, where none exist (along Eglinton for example), carved out of the existing landscape. Think of the disruption we are enduring here in the comparatively simple task of adding GO tracks to the existing line and right-of-way through Weston – imagine what carving out a rail corridor from scratch will involve. Unfortunately, the corridor along the north side of Eglinton (that Mr. Tory appears to think still exists) was sold off as surplus by the city in 2010 and is now a construction site for hundreds of new homes. Where Mr. Tory’s SmartTrack will fit along this route is anyone’s guess. And all of this will allegedly come to pass in 2021.

John Tory's Transit Plan

John Tory’s Transit Plan – click for larger image.

At its western end, Mr Tory’s SmartTrack line begins at the Matheson / Airport Corporate Centre (not the airport) – which connects to Mississauga Transit. It travels along Eglinton – until a few years ago, the planned route of the Richview Expressway. Once it hits Mount Dennis, the SmartTrack joins and heads down the GO / U.P. Express tracks towards Union. No mention is made of the U.P. Express or what his plans are to retain or modify the service.

Mr. Tory claims that the billions needed for SmartTrack will come from tax increment financing. This is the financial wizardry in which extra money is provided in the future by additional tax revenue generated by higher property values and therefore higher tax assessments along the new lines. Tax increment financing is how Rob Ford proposes to pay for his subways subways and more subways. ‘Nuff said.

John Tory's anticipated flow of passengers.

John Tory’s anticipated flow of passengers.

The Tory plan theorizes that passengers will be diverted from the east west and north-south subways and buses and use the SmartTrack trains from the west and east ends of the city to get to Union. This will provide, “congestion relief on the Yonge line for someone who lives in Lawrence Park or Leaside”.

Unfortunately, most commuters don’t want to go to Union Station. Only 260,000 do so daily and that’s using GO Train, GO Bus and subway combined. Bloor-Yonge is already straining with 420,000 daily passenger movements. Mr. Tory’s plan will simply add more pressure on this station from passengers hopping off SmartTrack and onto the Bloor Line in the West or East. Yes, the people of Lawrence Park and Leaside may be more comfortable but SmartTrack will add even more congestion to an already congested area. A downtown relief line is seen by experts as the only answer to this rapidly growing demand and Mr. Tory does not adequately explain how his SmartTrack will be an effective substitute.

It’s one thing to think outside the box and come up with a concept such as an above-ground subway. It’s another to believe that you and a group of your political advisors can ignore expert opinion and sit down with a map of the city and magically determine the fate of transit in this city for decades to come. The experts say that a downtown relief line is needed. SmartTrack is not an effective substitute.

With regard to finances, tax increment financing is fraught with peril. Extra revenue generated by such accounting sleight of hand is not guaranteed. This windfall would normally be taken into account to maintain and upgrade the city’s infrastructure so it’s not just free money.

Mr. Tory should defer to the experts (who spend whole careers immersed in the topic) before launching Toronto in yet another whimsical transportation direction with magical financing. The incumbent Mayor’s floundering has cost us dearly and set transportation in this city back by several years. Let’s not add even more delays and band-aids to an increasingly desperate situation. SmartTrack is the wrong track.

UP Express fares continue to draw fire

While the downtown media is hammering on the as-yet-undisclosed UP Express fares, they continue to miss a larger issue.

A union representative for airport workers told The Star that the airport train “isn’t public transit, this is transit for the 1 per cent”. The editorial board wrote “Fares should be priced to encourage people to leave their cars at home and take the train, not discourage them from using something they’ve already paid almost half a billion dollars to build.” An online survey they conducted found that about 75% of respondents thought that fares should be less than $20; half thought $10 was reasonable.

We should be glad that The Star, Spacing, and other media continue to push for more information. It is long overdue. The real news, though, is this: Metrolinx will be running an unaffordable and unprofitable service. Even though we’ve already spend $500 million and fares will be unaffordable, you and I will pay for Metrolinx to shuttle the elite around.

This is madness.

The Liberal government hid Metrolinx’s ‘business case’ from critics before the provincial election. Critics like Rosario Marchese called on them to release the details, but the Liberals filibustered in committee to hide the bad news.

They had good reason to bury the body: the Auditor General of Ontario had already said that there is no business case. “If the goal was for the ARL to break even in its first year… Metrolinx would have to charge about $28″ for each trip, according to the AG. But 75% of Torontonians said they wouldn’t take it if it cost more than $22.50. Nor would 60% of visitors.

In other words, it looks like Metrolinx needs to charge more than the market will bear to pay for the service.

The Star has noticed that the UP Express is going to cost riders. They should now notice the cost to taxpayers.

First look at UP Express trains

Amidst the flurry of excited announcements regarding the almost completed Pearson terminus, BlogTO has an article about a sighting of the actual trains that will be used for the Union Pearson Express. The sighting in Brantford by photographer James Gardiner shows a two-car train painted in subdued colours.

The trains will complete the journey from Terminal 1 at Pearson to Union Station in 25 minutes for an as yet undisclosed (but anxiously anticipated) cost. The trains will operate every 15 minutes for most of the day.

Also of interest to Westonians (since Weston is one of only two stops along the way) will be the cost of tickets from here to either end of the line. Many people have speculated that if demand for the service is underwhelming, the line could be converted to an above-ground subway serving additional stations along the length of the line.

Trains will be running in time for the July 10 2015 opening of the Pan-Am Games in Toronto.

Construction updates

Train construction will likely been even worse than usual starting soon. For 8 days starting Monday, August 11, lanes on Weston Road will be closed every night for 8 hours between Oak Street and St. Phillips Road. The closures will start at 9 pm and go until 5 am. This is to install bridge spans.

Water mains will be pulled through the pit around Church Street for two days, staring August 21. You won’t be able to access Cross from Church, and residents will be diverted. Parking will be a mess, too.  Trucks will be backing up and there will be a tower light shining on the work site.

King Street will be closed from today to Monday at the bridge for road work and other construction. There will be noise from “excavators, dump and concrete trucks.” There will also be a tower light.

 

Hark!–A transit plan that benefits WMD

The front-runner in the Toronto Mayoral race has a transit plan that would make Mount Dennis (and, to a lesser degree, Weston) a transit-rich part of the city. John Tory’s transit plan includes an electrified Georgetown track for LRTs that would connect with the Eglinton LRT.

Tory leads in the polls, though the election is months away, and his transit plan is a centrepiece of his campaign. As far as YHC can see, it is, as yet, unmatched by Olivia Chow (or, needless to say, Rob Ford).

map (1)

Tory’s campaign calls for a line that runs from the northeast of the city, through Union Station, back up to the airport area. It would run on the existing GO lines, except for the section after Mount Dennis, and it would be “express service”—with far fewer stops and trains than a subway. It would, however, run all-day and on 15-minute intervals, unlike today’s GO trains.

John Tory’s campaign says, cleverly, that Toronto has a hidden and underused resource—surface rail corridors. Currently, these are used by diesel trains, but he is calling for “EMUs”—trains that look like subway cars.

EMU copy

The exciting part for us, though, is that the train would run all day, from Mount Dennis, and join with the Eglinton LRT. Local commuters could choose to either go downtown via Union, or crosstown on Eglinton. Either path would connect with the subway.  The Weston—Mount Dennis area would have a GO train, the Eglinton LRT, and the Tory Train.

Tory says that the line could open in 7 years and be paid for by the increased taxes in the communities it benefits.¹

Your correspondent can’t find any answers to some natural questions:

  • Why not build to the airport instead of the industrial areas around it?
  • Why not use this to replace the UP Express?
  • Why not use the UP Express infrastructure for this?
  • Why does the east end get 13 stops while the west end gets only 8?
  • How, precisely, does it relate to the planned electrification of the GO corridors?

The plan has been generally well-received. Royson James says it is a “transformational” and “exhilarating” idea. Steve Munro, however, says that it is an idea that leaves downtowners out.

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¹ Yeah, I know.

Laura Albanese gets a promotion

Laura Albanese, our recently-reëlected MPP, has been given a promotion. She will now be Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance.

In other political news, Glen Murray, who promised to electrify the UP Express by 2017, was shuffled out of his position as Minister of Transportation. This comes with speculation that the reëlected Liberals may be short-circuiting expectations about electrification. He will now be Minister of the Environment and Climate Change.