STJE not open in time for September

Should have brought more shovels

St John the Evangelist’s new school will not be open in time for September, according to Dave Bennett, the chair of the Parent Council.

The board snuck the news in as point 2 of a letter to the community, which, sandwiched between caissons and culverts, says that “Due to an administrative delay in issuing the conditional building permit, and an unusually wet summer, the schedule completion date have moved to mid-November 2018”.

The students at St John the Evangelist have put up with years—indeed decades—of disruption: a tiny school without enough outside space, many portables, moving to a school in the Junction, moving to a school north of Weston, and now this: a broken promise to have the school opened in time for 2018.

Upcoming events

UrbanArts, the LEF, and Foodshare invite young people to the Youth Foodposium, on September 29. It sounds like a lot of fun.


Dr. Maureen Lennon is leading an 8-week writing workshop at the Weston Library, starting October 3. Maureen is an old friend, super woman, and the only person to have read my book. If she can be kind about my work, you have nothing to fear. You’ll have a blast.

 

Suspicious fire in model home on Weston Road

A local eyesore landmark was destroyed tonight. The hideous ‘model home’ on Weston near Dora Spencer Road was ruined in a blaze the fire department is calling suspicious.

According to 680News,

Fire crews responded to the scene on Weston Road and Dora Spencer Road at around 8:15 p.m. after multiple callers reported seeing flames shooting out of the home.

Platoon Chief Doug Harper said 11 trucks responded to the blaze and crews were met with “heavy fire”. The blaze was knocked down within the hour and no injuries were reported.

Pedestrian and bike committee meeting

Ward 11 now has a city-sponsored committee advocating for pedestrians and bicyclists, and your correspondent is delighted to be a member. We’ve

cycle toronto

had only one meeting, and our goals remain a touch nebulous, but our

mandate includes reaching out to see what needs to get done.

Paths, yes, everywhere paths! But what else do you think is important?

Here are some questions to get you thinking:

  • Where are pedestrians unsafe?
  • Do we need more pedestrian crossings? Where?
  • What do you need to ride your bike to work?
  • What do you think of bikes and transit? Do they work well together?
  • Does your bike need a repair? Still? How come?
  • Do you find it hard to lock up? Where? What could be done about that?
  • What about bikes and schools? How is that relationship working out?

Leave a comment or drop me a line at adam at westonweb.ca if you have input.

Toronto Life remembers Weston exists

Netizens around Weston rallied this week and scored a minor victory over the downtown media: Toronto Life amended an article to include Weston, a location it had entirely forgotten about when it listed the places around the GTA in which It had been shot.

The original article included locations as far away as Port Hope and Elora, but forgot about our beautiful town, which is featured prominently in the trailer. It’s not the first time Toronto Life has maligned us: in the past, they named us, without reason, as a lousy neighbourhood to live in. They were wrong about that, too.

 

 

 

Upcoming event

The Frontlines AGM will be September 19th at 7:30 pm at the York West Active Living Centre.

There will also be a celebration of Frontlines’ 30th Anniversary, which is this month.

Orville Wallace will be the keynote speaker, and Frontlines’ culinary program will provide a light meal and desserts.

You are asked to RSVP at info@frontlines.to by September 15th.

Weston students streamed into dead end pathways

York South–Weston students are being streamed into high-school programs that limit their life opportunities, according to Social Planning Toronto.

The province formally did away with streamed high-school programming many years ago, but much of the old system persists, SPT says.  The results are profound: students choose “academic” or “applied” courses in grade 8 that will affect their careers, and earnings, for decades—and they do so without knowing the difference.

Further, “low-income and marginalized students [are] over-represented in lower level courses”.

Map of applied courses
A single map in the report tells a sad and scary story: students in the poorer horseshoe around wealthy old-Toronto take more applied courses.

Applied courses are an academic lobster trap: easy to get into, but hard to get out of. Students are asked to take make-up courses in the summer or after school to make the transition into the academic program.

The report recommends:

  • Delaying choices about education pathways for as long as possible
  • Improving de-streaming
  • Providing better support for students who want to move into the academic stream
  • Improving communication about pathways to parents and students
  • Providing better one-on-one support, especially from teachers