Farmers Market opens for 2019

The Weston Farmers Market opened its 40th season on a crisp and sunny morning. This year, they are located in the Weston Park Baptist Church parking lot next to the one they were in last year (UP Express). Next year they will move to the Weston Hub on John Street.

Kazro sells some lovely bling.
Grandpa Ken is wisely still in Florida but his family are serving the same delicious back bacon sandwiches.
The Organic Chef has delicious baked goods.
Kayla Jardine was doing a brisk business selling original wall plaques.
Lincoln Line Orchards is back.
Handmade jewellery from Sterling Silva.
Honey from Sunderland Hives.
Joe Gaeta (with moustache) is back!
Thames River Melons is back for another season.
The Egg Man is back.
There is music!

York Memorial C.I. gutted in 6-alarm blaze.

Image result for york memorial c.i.
From Toronto District School Board.

A second, devastating fire has gutted the main, 90 year-old building of York Memorial C.I.. A huge plume of smoke was seen over the old City of York today, 24 hours after a smaller fire was discovered and extinguished.

Staff and students had been spending the day at George Harvey C.I. on Keele but were sent home after smoke from the fire hit dangerous levels. Fire Chief Matthew Pegg described the damage to the 90 year-old school as major but believes that the more recent additions containing the library and pool can be saved. Chief Pegg called today’s fire ‘separate and distinct’ and ordered the use of foam in order to suppress and starve the fire. He stated that a 6-alarm fire response is almost unprecedented in Toronto’s history.

High smoke levels were experienced south of Eglinton from Trethewey to Bicknell and firefighters went door to door advising residents to leave.

After yesterday’s fire, a security team was left behind to monitor the building but somehow, a different fire began today.

According to 12 Division’s Superintendent Ron Taverner the first fire was thought of as suspicious – he would not speculate on the probable cause of the second.

This month, the school was set to celebrate the 90th anniversary of its opening in 1929 as a memorial to soldiers who fought in the First World War. The building is currently home to 900 students (none of whom were in attendance today) and contains many artifacts and unique structures. These are feared to be lost as a result of the blaze.

Councillor Frances Nunziata was at the fire scene along with Mayor Tory. Nunziata said that she hopes that the school can be rebuilt inside while salvaging whatever is left. She said there will need to be a lot of healing in the next few months.

The only good result from today is that there were zero casualties.

Subways, Subways, Subways!

Here in Greater Weston™, a whole other set of politicians cater to our needs. Our MPP on this side of the river (Etobicoke Centre) is Kinga Surma . In her latest flyer, she announces, ‘The government is tunnelling the Eglinton Crosstown’.

She continues,

“Since I have been the MPP for Etobicoke Centre, I made a commitment to all of you that I would fight to tunnel the Eglinton Crosstown to the airport. Since last June, I met with the Premier, the Minister of Transportation and Metrolinx to emphasize the importance of providing Etobicoke residents with fast, reliable public transit; one that did not add to the congestion on Eglinton. We worked together for months to plan and budget a regional transportation system; something the residents of Etobicoke, Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area have been waiting for.

We are tunnelling the Eglinton Crosstown and we are building subways!

I will always fight for the people of Etobicoke Centre.

I want to thank you for your support throughout this process.”

Although Premier Ford has made it clear that tunnelling the westward extension of the Eglinton Crosstown is his preferred option, I can’t recall a government announcement that such a decision has been made.

If this is a done deal, there’s going to be a whole lot of money and time needed – plus some razzle dazzle from the Premier himself. Oh and perhaps the slight formality of an updated environmental assessment, further community consultation and finding the ‘efficiencies’ that will finance this endeavour.

Lastly, if Doug Ford doesn’t win the next Ontario general election in 2022, will appeasing Tory voters along the Eglinton corridor be on the next government’s priority list? It’s doubtful, so let’s not get too excited.

Sadly, transit decisions in this city and province are still made through election campaign napkin planning.

Gun buy-back program is deeply flawed.

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From myespanolanow.com

Toronto police and politicians would like to get guns off the streets. Quite correctly, the thinking is that reducing the number of guns in the city will reduce crime.

In response to this, Toronto Police are currently operating a gun buy-back program that will continue until May 17. The idea is to pay cash ($200 – $350) for guns so that they can’t be used in criminal acts. On the surface, this sounds like a good idea. Could such a program reduce the number of guns in criminal hands? Sadly, not the way Toronto’s doing it.

Residents wishing to participate are asked to call police to come to their residence and pick up a surplus weapon(s). Criminals having second thoughts about a life of crime are not likely to do this. Since the program is targeting legally held guns, the only people likely to participate are collectors and owners who want to make a bit of extra cash.

Sadly, the vast number of guns in the wrong hands will remain where they are, untouched by the program.

If the City and Toronto Police are serious about getting guns out of criminal hands, they need to hold a gun amnesty. Other police forces have done this; there’s no need to re-invent the wheel.

As it stands, the current buy-back plan is laughable.

Good news for Pan Am Trail cyclists.

The Pan Am Path passes through Weston, albeit grudgingly. Cyclists wishing to take the trail north of Cruickshank Park are forced to take a steep climb up the steps to the intersection of Weston and St. Phillips roads. In order to re-join the trail, a dangerous stretch of Weston Road must be traversed safely – from personal experience, this is no easy picnic.

The good news is that the multi use trail will have some new intersections as it crosses the Humber heading towards Dundas. Scarlett Road will be getting bike lanes along that stretch.

Looking south from Scarlett Rd and St Clair Ave W
The proposed new and improved intersection at Scarlett and Dundas.

The driving force for this comes from surveys and a public meeting held in late 2017 to discuss issues around the upgrading of the intersection at Scarlett and Dundas. Plans are to widen the space under the tracks and lower Scarlett to end the traffic bottleneck and height restrictions at that location. At the public meeting, among other things, the need for separated bike lanes was expressed. Plans were modified over the past year to include these as seen in the map and cross-section below.

Map of bike lane (cycle track) along Scarlett Road from the Humber River to just north St. Clair Avenue at Bernice Crescent. Options for cycling connections to Scarlett Road being considered for the future include Eileen Avenue to Pritchard Avenue or Eileen Avenue to Corbett Avenue.

A meeting to discuss the latest plans will be held early next week.

Date: Monday, April 29, 2019
Time: Drop in 6:30 to 9 p.m.. Presentation at 7 p.m.
Location: Lambton Park Community School, 50 Bernice Cres., Wheelchair accessible.

This meeting was requested by local Councillor Frances Nunziata who will be in attendance alongside Councillor Gord Perks.

For more details, click here.