Hussen faces tough situation

Having been released from prison for serious crimes, Abdoul Kadir Abdi, a Somalian-born childhood refugee, faces deportation. Abdi’s adoptive mother and Ahmed Hussen, the man who holds Abdi’s fate in his hands, both have ties to Weston: she lives in the riding, and Hussen is both her MP and the Minister for Immigration, Citizenship, and Refugees.

Eighteen years ago, Abdoul Abdi was taken by Nova Scotia’s child services, and he lived in many foster homes—but the province of Nova Scotia did not apply for Abdi’s citizenship. Had they done so, he would not be facing deportation now.

Asha Ali, his aunt (who has been Abdi’s mother since his birth mother died in a refugee camp) says she couldn’t apply. She spoke to Desmond Cole:

I tried! I insist more than three times in a row, but unfortunately I couldn’t succeed because the Department of Community Services, along with Children’s Aid, blocked my way and take me to court and said, “legal guardian of these kids permanently is us, and that’s our job. Asha should not apply [for] their citizenship.”

She says she met with Ahmed Hussen before he was elected, who, she says, told her her he would help. She says she has since been rebuffed:

DESMOND: And what has he done in recent times on this issue for you?

ASHA: Nothing. I tried since the last year going back and forth his office. His secretary and his assistants asked me [for] all the documents in this case. I put them up, I gave them. and then they asked me, “come back.” Tomorrow, next day, he’s not here, he’s in Ottawa. He’s gonna meet you next week. Week after week. And then next thing I know they said, “Ahmed Hussen’s not able to help you for this case—we’re closing the file.”

Abdoul’s sister asked Justin Trudeau about her brother’s deportation. He told her “As far as I know there hasn’t been any final decisions made yet…. I can assure you that our immigration minister, who himself came to this country as a 16-year-old Somali refugee, understands the challenges and the situation that your family is facing right now””

Upcoming events

The politicians of York South–Weston will be having a holiday open house next Sunday, December 10 at Frontlines, 1844 Weston Road. The event will be catered by the Frontlines culinary program.

Hussen much in the news on immigration plan

Ahmed Hussen, our MP, and the Minister of Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship, was much in the news this week as he announced the national immigration plan, which will see about one million immigrants arriving over the next three years.

Hussen said “As can be seen in the global environment, there are more and more countries that are closing their doors to people, they are closing their doors to talent and to skills, and, yes, to those who are seeking protection from persecution. We are emphatically and unapologetically taking the opposite approach.”

He told Power and Politics that “Immigration is a great tool for our economic growth” and that immigrants will help us with a declining ratio of workers to retirees.

Responding to a question about the roughly 40% of Canadians who oppose immigration, he said “I can tell you our settlement and integration services are the best in the world…. We can always do more and better, but let’s not kid ourselves, Canada is a global leader when it comes to welcoming and integrating people and making sure that they reach their potential.”

 

Ahmed Hussen’s bad day

With all the other talk of foreign governments influencing politicians, you might have missed the Maclean’s article last week on how Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the repugnant Turkish autocrat, has been influencing Canadian politics and our MP Ahmed Hussen.

Hussen was in Istanbul on the night of the coup attempt, reportedly on vacation with his mother. But, according to local sources, he was also there as a guest of some high-level AK Party politicians, including Kenan Sahin, the mayor of Istanbul’s Pendik district, and Cemalettin Kani Torun, the deputy chairman of the Parliamentary Foreign Affairs Commission. The next day, he described what he experienced that night to Canadian media in glowing terms.

After the attempted coup, Erdogan’s government imprisoned more than 120 journalists, fired 40,000 teachers, and purged 140,000 civil servants. He has built a 1,100 room presidential palace and changed the constitution so that he can remain President until 2029.

Hussen, perhaps, could not have guessed that there would be a repressive crackdown. But at a later meeting at the Turkish consulate, Hussen played slow pitch, according to Adnan Khan, the Maclean’s author:

The August gathering of Somalis at the Turkish consulate in Toronto—to discuss a coup attempt led by Turks in Turkey—seemed odd to some of those who were present. “It was strange,” Omar Hassan, chairman of the Somali-Canadian Business Council, told Maclean’s. “The Turkish delegation referred to the Gülenists as terrorists and everyone clapped. Hussen talked about the close relationship between Turkey and Somalia but never contradicted the ‘terrorist’ label.”

In the past, Hussen has posed with Erdogan and praised him, saying 

“Great mtg w Turkey’s President Erdoğan. Excellent discussion on ways to strengthen Canada-Turkey relationship.  I also lauded his amazing work in rebuilding Somalia.

The praise has been reciprocal; the Turkish government lauded Hussen for his (factually incorrect) support of Turkish aid in Somalia.

 

 

 

Hussen gets a front-page profile

Ahmed Hussen received a long profile on the front page of the Globe today.

Mr. Hussen, 40, has spent most of his adult life studying, debating, and expounding on what it means to truly belong in a country – as a community organizer for the poor, as a political staffer to Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty, as an immigration lawyer, and as the head of the Canadian Somali Congress. His rise is notable. But so, too, are the challenges he now faces: to manage an unpredictable, often-xenophobic American administration, to hold to Canadian values of openness against a worldwide tide of anti-immigrant sentiment. And, through it all, to keep Canadians safe.

Hussen still dodging questions

Ahmed Hussen, our MP and the Minister of Immigration, is still refusing to answer direct questions in the House.

This week, Michelle Rempel (CPC) asked him about the failure of more than half of Syrian refugees to find jobs, and how much that has cost the provinces.

Hussen did not answer. Instead, he told her how much the feds (not the provinces) have provided—not how much the refugees have cost.

Rempel pointed out that he did not answer the question, and posed another:

My question is very simple. How much will the government pay in Canadian taxpayers’ dollars to support its ill-fated refugee plan?

Hussen said that Canada is consistently praised for being compassionate (the thirteenth time he has mentioned that this year!) and said (for the fourth time) that the Liberals would “take no lessons” from other parties.
He then brought up Mexican visas for no discernible reason.

Hussen profile in Macleans

Macleans has a very flattering profile of our MP, Ahmed Hussen.

From Macleans

It’s virtually impossible to imagine a way in which the 40-year-old could be better suited to the cabinet job he now holds. He came to Canada fleeing the Somali civil war, and subsequently lived in Regent Park, a once-troubled and isolated downtown Toronto public housing project he would help rejuvenate and repatriate to the residents when redevelopment came calling. Later, he opened a law practice focusing on immigration law and criminal cases, particularly for young offenders.