Rogue retirement home (hopefully) shut down.

It’s hard to believe, but the In Touch retirement home continues to operate.  Now, Elaine Lindo, its operator, is again facing jail time.

In Touch is in the beautiful Tyrrell house at King and Rosemount. But while the outside is gorgeous, the inside is a nightmare.

The In Touch retirement home was exposed as abusive and disgusting in 2010 by an undercover Toronto Star operation. The Star found

People left in urine and feces-filled diapers for hours. Washrooms with no toilet paper so residents, some suffering from dementia, wiped themselves with their hands or a flimsy communal towel. No stimulation. Bad food. Poorly trained and underpaid staff, with just one on duty overnight.

A resident wandered away earlier this year and was later found dead.

Lindo has been punished by the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority almost every year since 2013. In 2015, she was given 15 days in jail. In January of 2019, she was found to be breaching her probation.

On June 3, Lindo “was ordered by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice to vacate and stop the operation of an illegal retirement home by June 7”.

Lindo told the court that she was the subject of racial and religious discrimination. She saidher spiritual beliefs had prompted her to help the homeless.”

Jarryl Hagley’s murderers get life sentences

The murderers of Jarryl Hagley, 17, at the Weston Pizza Pizza will serve at least 25 years in prison before they get the chance for parole. Brothers Lenneil and Shakiyl Shaw, both 25, and Mohamed Ali-Nur, 21, were convicted of first-degree murder two weeks ago and sentenced today.

The Hagley’s family and friends read their victim impact statements for several hours before the judge sentenced them.

Hagley was killed in late 2016 while he sat with friends in the Pizza Pizza. The murderers charged into the restaurant and shot at him with a shotgun and a pistol. Hagley was shot in the chest.

The killers’ escape was caught on video, and they were convicted in part on the testimony of an accomplice, whose car was used in the crime.

Jury deliberations underway in Jarryl Hagley murder case

The jury in the Jarryl Hagley murder case is now deliberating. Hagley was murdered inside the Pizza Pizza on Weston Road in 2016 by men caught on camera fleeing.

Mohamed Ali-Nur and Lenneil Shaw are alleged to have murdered Hagley while he sat in the Pizza Pizza with friends. Their alleged accomplice, Shakiyl Shaw, is said to have driven the getaway car. A fourth man, Winston Poyser, is testifying against the accused. Poyser says he consumed drugs and alcohol with them before they drove his mother’s car and spotted Hagley in the restaurant.

 

Gun buy-back program is deeply flawed.

Image result for gun amnesty
From myespanolanow.com

Toronto police and politicians would like to get guns off the streets. Quite correctly, the thinking is that reducing the number of guns in the city will reduce crime.

In response to this, Toronto Police are currently operating a gun buy-back program that will continue until May 17. The idea is to pay cash ($200 – $350) for guns so that they can’t be used in criminal acts. On the surface, this sounds like a good idea. Could such a program reduce the number of guns in criminal hands? Sadly, not the way Toronto’s doing it.

Residents wishing to participate are asked to call police to come to their residence and pick up a surplus weapon(s). Criminals having second thoughts about a life of crime are not likely to do this. Since the program is targeting legally held guns, the only people likely to participate are collectors and owners who want to make a bit of extra cash.

Sadly, the vast number of guns in the wrong hands will remain where they are, untouched by the program.

If the City and Toronto Police are serious about getting guns out of criminal hands, they need to hold a gun amnesty. Other police forces have done this; there’s no need to re-invent the wheel.

As it stands, the current buy-back plan is laughable.

Council to ask AGCO to yank licences after shootings

City Council will ask the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario to pull the liquor licences of establishments that have “been the scene of gun violence or where patrons have been in the possession of handguns or where the police have found handguns on the premises”.

Frances Nunziata said that his measure is necessary because

They’re open all night, it turns into a booze can or it turns into an after hours club, and they party on the streets and the next thing you know there’s guns and there’s gun violence….

They suspend their license for two or three weeks, and then they reopen….

People are afraid to walk down the street when they have that amount of violence.

Start video at 1:24:00 if it doesn’t do so automatically.

I’m pretty sure none of this is true. I come home pretty late on Friday nights, and I often ride my bike from strangling class. Of course, I’m not everywhere all the time, but I’ve never once seen a party on the streets. (Nor have I seen guns or gun violence).

The data, such as they are, back me up. There have been two shootings in Weston in 2019. Neither happened after hours. One happened in broad daylight, outside a convenience store—perhaps we could pull their lottery-tickets?

Nunziata’s efforts to clamp down on gun violence should be applauded. But this is neither a real effort nor clamping down. It’s a waste of time.

Worse, it’s an embarrassing slander against our town. Nobody wants to live in a place like she describes—but her riding is nothing like she describes it.

If Nunziata were serious about preventing crime and keeping kids safe, she could have funded after-school programs at libraries.