Santa brings the hype to Weston

Santa paid his 31st early visit to Weston yesterday, and the village threw a parade on his behalf.

Thousands of children lined Weston Rd in the afternoon to get stuffed on candy cane and catch a glimpse of the old man himself. And while nobody could hold a shiny nose to the man in red, the parade featured many of Weston’s illustrious cast of characters: the kids were thrilled by Indian Elvis, Miss Canada, the Screaming Shriners on their miniature motorbikes, and the city’s most spectacularly out-of-tune Air Cadet band. Even Rob Ford put in an appearance—the first mayor to ever do so, according to Frances Nunziata.

According to insiders, Santa will be back later this month, if the children of the city are generally nice. A very small, pointy-eared tipster who would not be named said “Looking good, so far. Tell Evie to lay off the late nights and Joshua to kiss his mom more. Just sayin’.”

Police announce traffic blitz

The police of 31 Division will be starting a safety campaign next week. From the 8th to the 14th, police will be nabbing motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians who pull bone-headed moves at crosswalks and stop signs.

In the blitzes, police often issue a disproportionate number of tickets to jaywalkers and bicyclists; readers may be forewarned.

Residents, though, certainly know that drivers generally treat Weston’s stop signs as merely cautionary, while parks and school zones are distractions for Bluetooth lobotomites.

Nightmare on Elm St

Hallowe’en night is always fun in Weston, but this year it was fantastic. Queens Dr was the place to be—there were kilos of candy, a mischief of monsters, and a zeal of zombies. They had come from all over the city; the street was almost impassable with parked cars and kids. Coming out of my house at the corner of King, I overheard a kid say “This street sucks compared to Queens.” And he was right.

While many of the houses on Queens brought gasps of horror, only one brought gasps of astonishment. It had a lawn full of pumpkins—a hundred or so, each lit and carved beautifully.

Weston King Neighbourhood Centre barbeque was a success

Even though it was a scorching day, dozens of people lined up for burgers at the Weston King Neighbourhood Centre community barbecue in Little Memorial Park on Saturday.

Many community groups were out to raise consciousness about the work they are doing in Weston. WKNC, Frontlines, the Hispanic Centre, the Active Living Centre, and others displayed their work in booths set up around the park.

With thanks to M. Lennon for reporting.

UrbanArts looking for artists

UrbanArts is looking for local artists who would like to be featured in their annual CultureShock Community Arts Festival. The festival is August 14th from 1–7 pm at Weston Collegiate Institute.

Auditions will be held on July 15 from 4–6 pm at UrbanArts on John St. Visual artists can submit their work directly by email.

Duelling meetings tonight

The Swanek Park Neighbour’s Night Out is tonight at 7:00. Residents will certainly be talking about the proposal to move St John the Evangelist school into the park and the accompanying demolitions, but city planners will also be presenting an alternative vision of the space.

The Catholic board has also called a meeting to discuss the issue—and while it’s the same issue, and at the same time, and on the same day, it’s in a different place. Their counter-meeting will be held at St John the Evangelist; the announcement says that board staff and the trustee will be answering questions about the new school site.

The Swanek Park meeting will be at 7:00 at the Queenslea St entrance. The city planners’ presentation will be at 7:30.

The TDCSB meeting also starts at 7 in St John the Evangelist Elementary School at 23 George St.

Documentary about Weston ends its run tomorrow

Tomorrow is the last day to catch a documentary installation about Weston.

Weston Public is being shown at the Beaver Hall Gallery as part of the Ryerson graduate school of documentary media exhibition. Sarah Sharkey Pearce created Weston Public to explore youth’s experiences in Weston and Mount Dennis.

The trailer (for the whole exhibition, not just her documentary, unfortunately) is below:

Beaver Hall Gallery is at 29 McCaul St downtown. The gallery is open from 12 – 7 and admission is free.