10 Wilby apartments: zoning amendment and Section 37.

Toronto City Council and its local equivalent, Etobicoke York Community Council is a strange beast. Its decisions often leave people scratching their heads. This time they’ve managed to do something right. You’d think it was an election year or something.

On July 4, the Community Council dealt with rezoning the land at 10 Wilby. Readers may remember that non-profit builder, Options for Homes has proposed a 22-story, 233-unit condo apartment building at that location. OFH prides itself on making home ownership affordable. What they do is supplement an owner’s down-payment by up to $75,000 so that the mortgage is reduced. When the owner eventually sells, OFH gets back their contribution along with a proportional increase if the apartment has appreciated in value. As a tradeoff, features like swimming pools and gyms are eliminated so that prices are held down.

The address of 10 Wilby is an interesting one as it is at the top of the Humber Valley with potential access to parkland and the Pan Am Path. Our longer term residents may remember it as the former site of the Ministry of Transportation licence office.

The 10 Wilby site as it appears today. Hickory Tree curves around the corner. Wilby Crescent is on the left. The Humber Valley lies beyond the trees and informal (but steep) trails lead down to beautiful parkland, the river, the Humber footbridge and the Pan Am Path.

10 Wilby is above a curve in the river so views from the new building’s upper floors will be spectacular.

As an added bonus, Weston GO and UP Express stations are a short walk away.

From Toronto.ca

In order to erect a building on the smallish Wilby site, a land swap was arranged with the business opposite so that there was enough room to meet code requirements.  In rare and sensible use of Section 37 money, the Community Council on Wednesday approved rezoning and a plan that would see OFH donate and spend $800,000 in order to:

  • Make a cul-de-sac at the end of Wilby
  • Build a sidewalk along Wilby and connect it to Weston Road
  • Plant 25 new trees on the property and adjacent city land
  • Convert the Hickory Tree Road lands abutting the subject property to parkland conditions
  • Improve local parkland and connectivity of local parkland to the Humber River valley; and
  • Provide streetscape improvements along Wilby Crescent, Weston Road and Hickory Tree Road which comply with the Streetscape Manual and are to the satisfaction of the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning.
  • Perform an archeological study

The Community Council also thought it would be prudent to warn purchasers that local schools may not be able to accommodate pupils from the building.

The section of Hickory Tree Road that will be naturalized. The 10 Wilby site is on the right.
The proposed naturalization of the land opposite the site. From Toronto.ca

For readers who are puzzled by the site actually being on Hickory Tree Road yet having the 10 Wilby address; you’re not alone. The comments following this earlier article may help.

Incidentally, there was one dissenting vote opposing the rezoning amendment; that of Ward 7’s very own (and almost Brampton MPP), Giorgio Mammoliti.

Next stop, City Council on July 23.

Today in Weston; June 11, 2018.

 

A beautiful ‘spring’ day along the Pan Am Path that runs below and to the West of Weston Road. There’s a whole different world by the river in Cruickshank Park. This evening, a cyclist travels north towards where the trail ends at a set of steps (St Phillips and Weston Road). This part of the trail was built in 2013 and hopes were high that it would continue north. Instead, cyclists must haul their bikes up the steps and continue along Weston Road to Fairglen (where the trail continues) with fading sharrows their only protection from busy traffic. If the stair climb doesn’t get you, a driver on Instagram will.

The end of the trail.

Councillor Nunziata assures us that negotiations are allegedly ongoing with the landowners whose properties lie between one part of the trail and another. WestonWeb has long campaigned for a better network of bike paths and trails. Alas, five years later, we’re still waiting.

Update: for reference, here’s a picture of the stairs from the trail end to street level at Weston and St. Phillips. Climbing this is no mean feat.

 

Padovani tackles TD Canada Trust closing.

TD Canada Trust in Weston.

Chiara Padovani wants to be York South-Weston’s next councillor for Ward 11, replacing long-time incumbent Frances Nunziata. She has become quite active in the ward and among other things is closely monitoring the state of retail in YSW.

She recently promised that she would contact the Financial Consumer Agency regarding the recently announced closure of Weston’s TD Canada Trust branch. The closure was announced without any community consultation and Ms Padovani is seeking such a consultation by writing to the FCAC’s Commissioner, Lucie Tedesco.

Here is the letter that Ms Padovani sent:

Re: File with reference number 363484

Dear Commissioner Tedesco,

I am writing to request a meeting regarding the closure of the TD Canada Trust Bank located at 1979 Weston Road in Toronto Ontario (Branch Number 335).

This marks the fourth TD Branch closure in York South-Weston, a community that has become the target of predatory lending and payday loans. The bank has failed to fulfill its obligation to consult with the community, and many customers – myself included – did not even receive notice of the bank’s closure.

As a resident and local social worker in the community, I cannot stress the importance of providing fair access to financial institutions. Had TD Canada Trust consulted with the community, they would have become aware of the social and economic hardship that this closure will cause to the residents of Weston including but not limited to:

Proximity – The branch is within walking distance of over 10,000 residents. Many of these residents do not own cars and spending nearly $7 on the TTC fare required to get to the new location will be a significant barrier for low-income customers. In Forest Hill, a far less densely populated neighbourhood, there are seven TD Banks within close proximity of each other.

Accessibility – The branch is located in a neighbourhood where many residents are seniors and people with disabilities. These residents rely on this branch because they can access banking services without having to travel far.

Lack of financial alternatives – CIBC, Scotiabank and TD Canada Trust branches have already closed down and left the neighbourhood. Predatory lenders are quickly filling the gap for financial services in York South-Weston. As you know, these institutions trap hard-working families in a cycle of debt and economic violence that will threaten the quality of life for too many in this community.

These are just some of the reasons I ask that the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada convene a public meeting between the community and TD Canada Trust to discuss and resolve the challenges posed by the bank’s imminent closure.

Sincerely,

Chiara Padovani

I contacted the MP for York South-Weston Ahmed Hussen a couple of weeks ago regarding the closure and a staff member tried to fob me off to the Ottawa office bizarrely claiming that it was not a local matter. After persisting, the staffer said he would inform the minister and call back but never did. Apparently that’s not an unusual experience.

If you would like to add your voice to the initiative, contact the FCAC at 1-866-461-3222 and mention file number 363484.

Today in Weston / Mount Dennis May 19, 2018

Eglinton Flats: the weather may have been dismal but plant hounds were taking advantage of the Roselands Horticultural Society’s annual plant sale. Yes, that’s Frances Nunziata on the far left.

Roselands Horticultural Society was founded in 1926 and operates in Mount Dennis. The society works with schools in the area and also with the Long Term Care Facility at West Park Hospital.

Members meet on the 4th Tuesday of every month at  the Church of the Good Shepherd, 1149 Weston Road. 7:30 pm.

What about gentrification?

From The Economist.
Gentrification holds both a promise and a threat, depending on who you talk to.

The gentrification of an area, once under way, seems to be an inevitable and unstoppable process once wealthier people move in. This causes rising prices that drive a significant number of people away – perhaps some of the area’s more vibrant members. At least that’s the theory pushed by the left. On the other hand, gentrification proponents say that non-gentrified communities miss out on cleaner, better surroundings with people stuck in poverty while crime levels rise.

Gentrification is hard to study. If someone moves away, how do we know that gentrification is the cause? All neighbourhoods have a ‘churn’ with people arriving and leaving for various reasons. We do know that change comes slowly to neighbourhoods.
Toronto’s downtown area is expanding and gentrification of adjacent areas has followed. Forty years ago, the Junction was an artistic haven with cheap rents and property because of  its grimy industry and toxic residues in the soil. It’s been cleaned up since and is a now hot area. Bloor West Village the same. Mount Dennis with its vibrant residents’ association, new Crosstown Station and Net Zero initiative may be next.
Once gentrification starts in an area, more people want to live there and demand drives up prices. Is there a danger of this in Weston / Mount Dennis? A review of the literature on gentrification found that,
New fixed-rail transit has a generally positive effect on both residential and commercial property values, but its impact varies substantially according to context.
There are signs of greater investment since the UP Express became an affordable commuter train.  How then, can we keep people from being forced out as prices rise?
There is a fair amount of subsidized housing in our area. This is unlikely to change. In addition there are affordable rental apartments. Elsewhere, rent control keeps accommodation costs down but may stifle new housing.
 In a study of Philadelphia neighbourhoods, Richard Florida found that there are benefits to gentrification that are enjoyed by all but the poor and vulnerable. He also found that there are fairly unstoppable market forces behind gentrification when it occurs and the secret to minimizing damage is to ensure that the most vulnerable are still able to access housing and work opportunities and that their micro neighbourhoods are well maintained.
If the secret is to have a variety of housing and work options, it doesn’t help to have penny pinching councillors (as we do out in the boonies) who make it their business to keep taxes down and starve initiatives that help poor people.
Here’s an example. The expansion of Woodbine Racetrack was recently under discussion at council. More gambling will bring problems to the community. A motion was put forward to ameliorate the negative effects by requiring that the new gambling facility install a daycare for employees and also hire a percentage of local residents. Here are two motions put forward:
1. OGGLP provide a maximum of $5 million to develop and equip a child care centre on site or within the vicinity land and work with the Children’s Services division in recruiting a not for profit operator for the site and request that the selected operator provide extended hours of operation and provide casino employees with priority access to the centre.
The motion carried but local councillor Mike Ford voted against it.

3 – Motion to Amend Item moved by Councillor Joe Mihevc (Lost)

That City Council amend the Community Benefits Agreement with the Ontario Gaming Greater Toronto Area Limited Partnership set out in Attachment 1, as amended, in accordance with the following:

a. amendments to the employment and hiring terms to provide that:

i. OGGLP will hire a minimum of 50 percent new hires through social or local hiring, of which at least half must be local hiring; and

ii. after two years of operation, at least 60 percent of employees shall have full-time employment;

This motion lost narrowly by 19 to 23. Guess who voted against that? Local Councillors Mike Ford,  Vincent Crisanti, and yes, our own Frances Nunziata.
It’s voting like this that does not help vulnerable residents.
Here’s another example; living in a rooming house is probably quite cheap but the city fights rooming houses and accommodations that don’t fit into the middle class mindset e.g. the alleged illegal dwellings above the Weston Station restaurant.  Surely there is a way for these accommodations to be cleaned up, made safe and licensed – especially when housing is in such short supply.
If we had affordable housing spread evenly throughout the city, gentrification would not be an issue. The city did help recently with a ban on Airbnb basement apartments but unless some brave city or provincial politicians enact legislation to insert affordable housing in every area of the city, we’re going to be stuck with the present model of an expanding gentrified zone spreading out from the core and no amount of protests and marches will stop that.
The left needs to get its act together and figure out a way to embrace the positive benefits of gentrification without allowing it to drive people out of the area. They haven’t done that yet. The right needs to understand that cutting services to the poor simply entrenches poverty and the consequential crime that comes when people have no route to prosperity.
Finally, a well managed community has room for everyone regardless of income or personal circumstance. The mark of a good society (and good people) is how well it takes care of its most vulnerable.

New entrant in race for councillor

Ward 11 has been Frances Nunziata’s turf for as long as the ward has existed, and nobody has come close to unseating her: the last serious challenge was by Paul Ferreira, in 2006, and he was walloped.

Nunziata’s long reign may, at least, be challenged. Chiara Padovani, a left-leaning activist, announced her candidacy this week. In her letter to residents, she said,

For too long, we’ve been forgotten by City Hall.

Overcrowded buses, potholes, flooding, abandoned lots with overgrown weeds – these are just a few examples of the municipal neglect in our community. Growing inequality, unaffordability, declining city services, and a lack of meaningful community engagement from the current leadership at City Hall, threaten to worsen the quality of life for all of us.

But it doesn’t have to be like this.

Chiara Padovani
From Twitter.

Padovani has institutional support like no challenger has had in more than a decade, and she will flank Nunziata from the left, where Nunziata is weakest. She has also been positioning herself for a several months as an advocate and community member, and led opposition to a meat plant at 200 Rockcliffe (including in these pixels).

Nunziata has not yet filed her election paperwork, but when she does so, she will be the third candidate in the riding. Joey Carapinha, with whom your correspondent is unfamiliar, has also registered.

1705 Weston Road Meeting well attended

There was a crowd upwards of 70 people in attendance last night at 1901 Weston to hear details of a by-law amendment proposal that would allow a (so far, nebulous) 25-storey, 82 metre, mixed-use building to be built on a site at Weston Road and Victoria Avenue. The meeting was called by the City of Toronto so that residents could get more details about the proposal from the developer, architect and city officials. No decisions have been made yet -comments from residents concerning the proposal will allegedly guide the Planning Department as to what they will or will not approve. Councillor Nunziata and MPP Laura Albanese were present.

The meeting was kicked off by Sean Rooney a member of the planning department who stated that their goal is to see something built that fits into the local environment. He referenced the 2004 Weston Urban Design Guidelines state that buildings should be restricted to 8 storeys, having an appropriate size and scale and support the vitality of the area. There’s also the tall building guidelines that somehow come into play. In addition, new guidelines have also been added to encourage more children to be raised in high rises.

There were several groups in the crowd, not all on the same page. A group from ACORN would like to see an affordable housing component built into whatever ends up there. Local homeowners are concerned about the extra noise, shadow impacts and traffic; some want a condo built stating that we have too much rental accommodations in Weston while others reported that even Weston’s comparatively low rents are too high for them.

The proposed building. Note that there will only be four balconies per floor – these will be a feature of the two or three-bedroom units.

The building, it was revealed by the developer, will be a condo not a rental but in these early stages, there is openness to some leeway. According to the owner, talking about the interior details would be speculative as nothing has been decided yet.

The architect explained that the odd placement of the top section lumped onto the lower is to “align with the residential zone across the street” and also to assist with shadow impacts. Incidentally he glossed over the shadows that the building would cast in December. Weston Road will be widened in the future by 12 feet further restricting the site. A further limitation on the site is that there must be a 30 metre setback from the rail line. (I wonder how this would affect future rail corridor widening.)

Many expressed concern over the height of the building and the impact of traffic in the area. With a potential for over 500 residents in the building, and an assumption from the developer that 50% of residents would be using public transit, 6 visitor parking spaces seems low.

Other concerns from residents:

  • Noise from trains would be reflected by the tall building to other residents.
  • Property values of nearby homes will be negatively impacted.
  • 500 additional residents will bring unacceptable traffic levels along Victoria Avenue.
  • There is not enough ground floor retail space for a supermarket.
  • The development is not in keeping with the scale of the neighbourhood.
  • Other Toronto communities think 14 stories is too tall – why 25 here?
  • This is not responsible development.
  • Concern about density.
  • Concern about affordability.
  • The proposal does not fit into the community.
  • This will create a precedent if approved.
  • We don’t need another rental building.
  • Can a community control its own destiny?
  • What about affordable child care spaces in the building?
  • Why is there confusion over height guidelines? – They conflict with each other.

Sean Rooney from the Planning Department would like to hear further comments on the proposal.
Tel. No. (416) 394-8245
By email: here