Sidewalks are coming. Slowly.

You heard it here first: an increasingly rare urban design that is prevalent in Weston will soon be lost to history.

It’s a change you’re not likely to regret, however.

Several of the roads north of Church Street have no sidewalks, or have sidewalks on only one side of the street. The city now plans to remedy that and add sidewalks to every street in Toronto, as part of its Vision Zero plan to reduce pedestrian and cyclist deaths.

The story I’ve heard is that in the 1950s, when people expected to drive everywhere, streets in suburbs were built without sidewalks. Now that the the mania for auto-eroticism has passed, we’re regretting that decision.

The city says that sidewalks will be installed, bit by bit, when road reconstruction happens, or as a standalone project, subject to budget availability.

 

 

Mount Dennis Crosstown update

From Metrolinx. Click to enlarge.

For some strange reason, WestonWeb wasn’t invited to the recent press tour of the Eglinton Crosstown facilities. The tour was to show off the latest construction milestones of the mammoth project. The storage and maintenance facility being built on the old Kodak Lands will be ‘ready to receive trains’ in just six weeks. Don’t get your hopes up. There will be no passengers on the line until October 2021 at the earliest.

There are some good reports of the event, one of which can be read in Urban Toronto here.

1916 Weston and Mount Dennis map detail

There is a huge and detailed map of Toronto, printed in 1916 that shows the various townships that make up the Toronto of today. It’s interesting to see the land holders of that time whose names now adorn our streets.

The map has been digitized and is currently hosted on the University of Toronto Library website. Below is a small section of that map showing our locale and with the folds digitally removed for clarity. It’s a fascinating look at the Weston, Mount Dennis and Lambton Mills of a century ago. The concentric circles on the map radiate from the intersection of Bloor and Yonge.

In Weston Village, Pine and Elm streets can be seen but Maria, Elizabeth and Beech streets are no more. Further south, West Park Hospital now occupies the site of the National Sanitarium where many tuberculosis patients were treated. A Janes Walk a couple of years ago toured the site of the old piggery that fed patients. West Park now specializes in many areas but treats TB patients to this day although thanks to antibiotics, not in such large numbers.

For the complete map (and many hours of browsing) grab a coffee and click  here.

From University of Toronto Library. Click to enlarge.

MacDonald Avenue to get 19th Century upgrade.

A tree on MacDonald Avenue weakened by utility pruning. (Google.ca July 2017)

Here is a notice from Toronto Hydro:

MacDonald Avenue

  • Project ID: W18159
  • Activity: Overhead Civil and Electrical
  • Timeline: October 2017 – December 2018
  • Status: Current

Toronto Hydro is planning to rebuild the aging overhead electrical system in the community to help improve service reliability. The rebuild includes upgrading overhead electrical cables and replacing hydro poles within the City of Toronto’s public property allowance in front of or adjacent to the lot. Throughout this project, planned outages may be necessary to switch from the old to the new electrical system and we intend to provide advance notice. Toronto Hydro crews and contractors will take extra care and precautions around the property. Please be advised that as a result of the project, our contractor may be trimming a number of the overgrown trees on the public road allowance in order to accommodate new hydro infrastructure. Upon project completion, affected areas will be restored.

So, instead of replacing MacDonald Avenue’s overhead wiring with underground cables, Toronto Hydro will continue to use a 19th Century method of bringing power to homes and businesses. This will ensure a continuing vulnerability of the power supply to ice storms, lightning strikes, vehicle collisions and falling trees. Speaking of trees; pruning them to make room for wiring is harmful and our trees would last far longer if they weren’t weakened by being trimmed.

The average life of a hydro pole is about 35 years so the MacDonald Avenue installation should last until 2053. Oh, and don’t hold your breath expecting that all of the old poles will be completely removed.

It seems that Toronto Hydro would rather spend its money on executive remuneration than on upgrading infrastructure, preserving trees and improving our streetscape. Yes, it would be initially more expensive to bury power lines but it would be an investment in the future and save money (repairs from the 2013 ice storm cost over $170 million) and inconvenience in the long run.

Crosstown posts drone footage

This video was posted at the end of January but shows the work going on at the old Kodak site very clearly including the new Crosstown Line Mount Dennis Station, the Kodak building, the new vehicle maintenance building and the train storage facility.

The size of the project is quite astonishing.

Thanks to Henry Rientsma for posting the video to facebook.

Crosstown update and open house tomorrow

Metrolinx is holding an open house to showcase its Eglinton Crosstown project tomorrow, Tuesday, between 6:30 and 8:00pm. The project is set to open in 2021 and provide rapid transit and connections along and (mainly) under Eglinton between Mount Dennis and Kennedy Road. On display will be images of construction progress, construction timelines and details of likely impacts that future construction will bring in terms of noise and inconvenience.

Location: York Recreation Centre at 115 Black Creek Drive.