Very tall building proposed for Hollis Ave

The owners of the properties between 15 and 21 Hollis Avenue in Mount Dennis are proposing a 34-storey, 365-unit residential building on the small, residential street.

From the proposal

Bousfields, who wrote the report, say that the tall tower fits in because it will

frame and enhance the streetscape along Hollis Street, and provide an appropriately scaled building that is compatible with the future development potential of adjacent properties.

I’ll be honest. Try as I might, I don’t get it. The planners provide many reasons why this should work, but to me it comes down to something simple: This is a very tall tower surrounded by lovely little homes on a very narrow street. Will it fit in the future, if the whole block is redeveloped? Maybe. Does it fit and frame the neighbourhood as it exists now? No.

Speaking of redeveloping the block, though, the report references a nearby and similar proposal. The owners of 8–16 Locust—just one street north—are asking to build a 35-storey building (the tallest building in Mount Dennis). It, too, would be on a quiet, narrow street. That application, Bousfields notes, is being appealed to the Ontario Land Tribunal, “following Council’s failure to make a decision”.

Mount Dennis development meeting

The city has released the “Mount Dennis Framework Plan Preliminary Analysis Report” (that’s a mouthful) that outlines the village’s history, land use, development, environment, and infrastructure.

I confess, I haven’t read it (it’s 114 pages, and I’m in the thick of marking), but if you get the chance, and you’d like to weigh in, there will be a community meeting on March 18 at 6:30. You can register online.

The report will be used to “guide future change and development within Mount Dennis.”

Booze at the 7-11?

Here’s a first: the 7-Eleven convenience store at Weston and Jane has applied to sell wine and beer.

There’s a catch: you’d have to drink it on site. You won’t be allowed, even under the new COVID rules for restaurants and bars, to take it home with you. What will this look like? Nobody really knows, other than that there will be “designated consumption areas of the shops”.

From Google Maps

The application is being considered by the AGCO. It has not been approved, and you can comment on it.

Planning survey in Mount Dennis

The city wants your input on the greatest (and not greatest) parts of Mount Dennis. They have a really neat (and deep) website that asks you to drag pins to the parts of the community you’d like to comment on. You can also review other people’s thoughts.

There is also a survey of proposed community plans (including high- and mid-density housing), streetscapes, and festivals; and another survey of that allows for longer comments on your ideas for the future of Mount Dennis.

2020’s cheapest house is in Mount Dennis

The least-expensive house sold in Toronto in 2020 was for $420,000. It was on Ray Avenue, in Mount Dennis.

It’s the white one.

This article is worth a read. It’s an agent’s take on the place.

The house is pretty cute on the outside, but it’s not cute on the inside. In fact, it’s a bit scary.

But that $420k buys the cheapest teardown in Toronto now—that’s terrifying.

More Crosstown Delays

Influential Toronto transit blogger Steve Munro is reporting a significant development in construction of the Eglinton Crosstown Line. Metrolinx has consistently stated that the line will not open until all stations are ready. Now it seems that thanks to various factors, Eglinton Station (at Yonge) might not be ready until May 2022 and a direct connection to the subway will be delayed until fall of that year.

Why the change in plans? Steve points out that, “The expected June 2022 provincial election will bring considerable pressure to provide a ribbon cutting for Premier Ford at whatever cost is necessary.”.

Read his blog post here.

View an interesting take on the line from Reece Martin below:

Update: Metrolinx CEO Phil Verster has called talk of a partial opening as a ‘distraction’. Verster seems unhappy with builders of the line, Crosslink Transit Solutions.

Read more here.