Local playwright nails it

GG-Award-nominated Donna-Michelle St Bernard, who lives in Mount Dennis, got a cracking review for her new play, Sound of the Beast, in the Globe and Mail.

Poetry has long had a major presence on stages at Canadian theatres; poets, less so. This may account for why Sound of the Beast, Donna-Michelle St. Bernard’s new performance at Theatre Passe Muraille, is so unusual and disarming. A certain distance we’re accustomed to at the theatre has disappeared. Here’s a poet; now listen.

 

Kodak Building 9 interior photographed.

The Kodak recreation building, (officially known as Kodak Building 9) was moved from its foundations last summer. The idea was to create new foundations that the building will return to and become part of the new Mount Dennis Station.

Kodak Building 9 interior. From Crosstown LRT  Twitter. Click for larger image.

It was recently photographed and the worker inside illustrates the awesome size of the building while graffiti still festoons the interior walls.

Read more about last summer’s move here.

MDCA collecting opinions on reading garden

The Mount Dennis Community Association and the library are collecting opinions on improvements to the reading garden, and they’re shooting for a grant from the City. Your opinion will doubtless help.

Reading garden plan

Complete with a vertical garden, solar-panel operated ventilation and a rainwater collection system, the vision for the garden was beautifully portrayed in local resident and George Brown Architectural Technology student, Rachel Carter’s concept drawing.

 

Net zero sets the media on fire

Mount Dennis’ Net-Zero drive has set the media world ablaze (with low-carbon emissions). About 60 people turned up to hear the plans for Toronto’s first EcoNeighbourhood at the open house this Monday.

The CBC and Metro ran a nice pieces on the developing plan to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, reduce strain on infrastructure, build energy resilience, and provide local growth.

District energy systemAccording to the city, building retrofits (especially to apartments) and more stringent design of new buildings can virtually flatten emissions growth if—a big if—almost everybody participates. Solar power can put another, albeit small, dent in emissions.

Block-scale infrastructure projects have much promise. These are technologies your correspondent is unfamiliar with, such as sewer-heat recovery , district energy systems (DES) and combined heat and power (CHP)plants.

District energy systems are already used elsewhere in Toronto. Instead of each building having heating and air conditioning, production is done centrally. Pollution reduction comes from hooking up to CHP plants, which use waste heat from energy production to warm water and homes.

The city says that 21% savings can be achieved in less than 5 years. Conserving more than half of the energy consumed will take more than 10 years.

 

 

 

 

Readers, who do you patronize?

Weston / Mount Dennis are communities that are on the upswing after going through some rough times in the past couple of decades. New businesses like Supercoffee and Perfect Blend have opened up while a few of the old ones like Wards and P&Ms have survived and are thriving. We’re wondering if you, dear readers, know of a local business that is worthy of a mention. It could be a store, restaurant or a service but one that makes you glad you live here.

Please mention that local business you patronize in the comments section. If we haven’t already, we’ll try and write a feature story on them.

 

Weston station faces threats

If you build it, they will go away.

That’s the news Metrolinx delivered this week, when they released “long-delayed” reports that said riders would be so frustrated by Tory’s SmartTrack stops that they would get back in their cars. It’s a conclusion that threatens the Weston GO station, too.

 

Weston has been quite lucky to have both a GO and a UPX stop, but when the Mount Dennis station is finished in 2022, our luck may run out. Like the Weston station, the Mount Dennis station will connect with the GO and the UPX—but in addition, it will have a link with the Eglinton LRT and busses. Will Metrolinx have three GO and UPX stops within 10 km: Weston, Mount Dennis and St. Clair?

This week’s report suggests they might not. Every stop slows down riders and drives them away from the service.

Obviously, there are four options:

  • Closing both the GO and UPX stations
  • Closing the UPX
  • Closing the GO
  • Closing neither

Your correspondent bets that Metrolinx will close the GO station—and would close both if they could. The reasons are clear:

  • GO Trains accelerate and decelerate slowly, so an additional stop causes more inconvenience.
  • Ridership must be down a great deal now that the UPX is cheap
  • Very few people get on the GO in Weston going to Kitchener, and fewer still who would not take the UPX one stop in the wrong direction to Mount Dennis to get on the GO heading out of town.

Two solutions would be an integrated fare or fare by distance, so Westonians could get on the UPX and not be penalized for jumping on another mode of transit at Mount Dennis. Your correspondent doubts very much that Metrolinx will miss a chance to burn Westonians, however.