Man falls to death, SIU investigating

The Special Investigations Unit is investigating after a 30-year-old man fell to his death from a balcony at 1775 Weston Road last night.

The police, searching for someone, knocked on the door of an apartment, and “shortly after that, a man fell from the apartment unit”. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

New park to be built in Mount Dennis?

The Mount Dennis Community Association showed the power of the people and got Frances Nunziata to look into creating a new park out of a “wasteland” at Brownville and Barr Ave.

A long-time vacant City owned lot on Brownville (beside the rail tracks opposite Barr Ave.) has been generating complaints from neighbours about accumulating litter, dog-poo and general lack of maintenance. The City’s Real Estate staff administer the site, and proposed to simply fence it in. But fifteen local residents showed up at an April 24 meeting with Councillor Nunziata at the Library, and most of them had other ideas. At the end of the meeting, the Councillor agreed to try and get the site transferred over to the Parks & Recreation Department as a first step towards upgrading it for community recreational activities. 

Man arrested for murder of Kareem Hastings

Toronto Police have arrested a man for the December murder of Kareem Hastings. Kadeem Davis, 22, was arrested last night and charged with first-degree murder. A second suspect is still wanted.

Hastings was found dead in a stairwell of 2089 Lawrence Avenue. He had been shot hours earlier, but no call was made to police at the time of the shooting.

 

Cops should be where they’re needed.

The Toronto Police report optimistically named, ‘The Way Forward‘ is running into flak from police union head Mike McCormack.  One of the suggestions in the report is to deploy officers in low crime areas to parts of the city where criminal behaviour is more prevalent. McCormack claims that after spending time to get to know a community, cops moved to other areas will be strangers. This apparently will negate all the good feelings engendered by community barbecues and the like.

Contrary to his new found love of community policing, McCormack was a fan of ‘carding‘. The practice of profiling, questioning and documenting people based on factors arbitrarily determined by an officer. Incredibly, while carding was abolished this year, data gathered in the past (some of it obtained illegally) has been retained. Carding did little to prevent crime but did much to alienate visible minorities. When I was young, many years ago I was profiled because of my youth, especially when driving. I can only imagine what it’s like to be young and black where profiling is practised.

Here in Weston it would be nice to see a few extra cops occasionally. Despite our fearsome reputation, we’re not a hotbed of crime. Although dealing drugs at 2 a.m. anywhere in the city is going to be bad for your health, the downtown waterfront is a far more dangerous place than Jane and Lawrence in the wee small hours.

The old saying goes that you can catch a lot more flies with honey than vinegar. Back in the 20th Century, police would be visible in neighbourhoods. They talked to people and patrolled where they were needed.

It’s just as well McCormack doesn’t have anything to do with fire services. The same way that it’s a good idea to put fire fighters where the fires are, let’s put cops where they’re needed, not where they’re comfortable.

12 Division will not close

The Mount Dennis Community Association has good news;  12 Division, our local police station, will not be closing “anytime soon”.

Our campaign certainly raised visibility, and the interim report has delayed any decisions on 12 Division for a couple of years. (until after the next municipal election!) We still have a few signs left, and did not recover all our costs, but certainly a valuable investments in the community! SO save our sign and be ready for round two!

New police action plan released

Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders. (From cbc.ca)

The Way Forward was a catchy title used to describe best practices in Canadian palliative care, fostering success and innovation in Newfoundland and Labrador and as of today, the name of a report from Toronto Police. The report was seen to be a necessary response to a crisis of confidence in the force, the growing cost of policing and the need to adopt more modern policing methods.

It’s interesting that the public has known about the problems with Toronto Police for years. They  have known about the lack of involvement in communities, an overly belligerent response to situations requiring intelligence and finesse and a large body of evidence that police treat certain visible minorities differently. The cost of policing was also an issue that had risen relentlessly in the past few years. When Rob Ford ordered a pay freeze, then Chief Bill Blair just ignored him. Mayor Tory was able to appoint his own candidate as Chief and Mark Saunders has delivered the required report.

In addition to knowing about the problems, the public has known for a long time what the solutions were. Namely that police officers should become more visible, get out of the cruisers, crack down on gangs and gun crime, walk the beat and treat all people with respect. To some extent, there seems to be a willingness in the report to do this.

While the police should have a base in the community, large fortress police stations could be replaced by several storefronts. Nothing in the report suggests that this will change other than closing some stations.

The lucrative after-hours job of paid duty now sees 80% of cops on the Sunshine List. These jobs, such as supervising road works, could be done for a lot less by others. The report tackles this to some extent.

Police forces are notoriously difficult to turn around. Part of the problem is that the qualification to apply for the job is a mere Grade 12 diploma – a requirement unlikely to attract deep thinkers. Another is the overwhelmingly male (>80%) and white (>75%) component to the force. Yet another is the complete lack of psychological profiling for suitability. Nothing in the report suggests that this will change.

Training needs to be beefed up with the emphasis on the safety of the job – very few police officers are killed or injured compared to construction workers for example. In spite of this many officers react in situations where they show fear rather than courage and the consequences can be deadly for the public. There are several mentions of increased training in the report.

Will the new report turn things around? It’s nice to see that there is a set of specific recommendations that are time and performance based so that’s a good thing. The bad thing is that although the recommendations have timelines, many are vague and require more discussion and study. Look for little or no change on these.

Here are the recommendations in the report:

Recommendations 1-8 (Click to enlarge).
Recommendations 9-13 (Click to enlarge).
Recommendations 14-16 (Click to enlarge).
Recommendations 17-21 (Click to enlarge).
Recommendations 23-25 (Click to enlarge).

Let’s hope that real change is coming.

Read the official report summary here and the full report here.

 

The fight for 12 Division

Mount Dennis and Weston residents are fighting to keep the police station in the community, according to InsideToronto.

“We think we have something good going with policing,” Mount Dennis Community Association president Mike Mattos said.

“We are talking. We are having the conversation. We would take a step backwards if they close it.”

The police station at Trethewey faces closure as part of money-saving measures. The new headquarters will be at St Clair and Old Weston Road–quite far away.

Visit InsideToronto to see how you can pick up a sign and help the cause.