25 Storey building for 1705 Weston

Oldstonehenge, the owners of 1705 Weston Road, have filed their application to develop a 25-storey building on the site just south of the GO and UPX station.

The building described will have a 6-storey base and a 19-storey tower with 240 rental apartments, ranging from studio to three-bedroom units.

1705 Weston today
One of the buildings to be demolished

Two industrial buildings and one house, at 10 Victoria Avenue, will be demolished.

The building, to my eyes at least, is quite attractive, with two interesting rotations of the generally cubic form, each about one-third of the way up.


Architectural drawing

 

Two long reads worth your time

A couple of long reads worth your time this weekend:

John Michael McGrath weighs in on the ugly-looking process behind the province’s hydrogen-powered GO train push, which could replace the well-developed and reasonable plans for electrification:

Metrolinx is asking for private companies to bid to make something that doesn’t currently exist. The costs are a big question mark. So is the performance. One of the reasons the government was going to go with overhead wires was that electric trains can accelerate faster than their diesel counterparts, allowing a railway to run more vehicles in and out of stations, safely. That means more frequent train service for riders. Can Metrolinx find a hydrogen train vendor that can meet those specs while delivering the number of trains needed by the 2025 deadline?


The Globe’s Alex Bozikovic covers what houses we should be keeping in Toronto, and the broken-down system of heritage evaluation. It’s a mess, and one we struggle with in Weston.

The areas of the city that are facing the most development pressure – and where planning is most open to development – is in and around the downtown core, which is also the area richest in built heritage.

“We wind up asking, What do we want to keep?” Ms. MacDonald says. “And the larger question, a very different question, is, what matters to people? What are the landmarks for different faith communities, for different waves of immigration? Not everyone in Toronto has the same history. We believe that the city’s architectural heritage represents community and social value as well.”

More on 135 John

The Toronto Star has picked up the story of the lot division at 135 John.

Alino Lopes thought the lot he bought in Weston could be a place for him and his daughter to live side by side.

Instead, they’re finding the aging house they’re hoping to tear down and replace with two new ones is becoming the centre of a conflict between those who want to preserve the neighbourhood’s eclectic character, and provincial plans that favour intensification.

From The Toronto Star