30 click speed limit proposed in much of YSW

Red and blue streets will not have their speed limits changed. Black streets will have the limit dropped to 30.

The Etobicoke York Community Council will consider whether to lower the speed limit on all “local roadways” in Ward 5, which covers Weston and Mount Dennis.

“Local roadways” are the great majority of streets—the last meters between major roads and driveways. In these maps, they are the black streets. Blue and red streets will not have their speed limits changed. (I may have copied the maps for all all of Mount Dennis and Weston. If your street is missing, let me know.

The speed limit changes come from the “Vision Zero” plan the city adopted in 2017.

Stop signs coming to South Station and John

The curve in the road where South Station meets John Street is pretty dangerous. To me, it looks like it should be an all-way stop because there are wide sidewalks and a large pedestrian area near the bridge.

But the cars don’t stop—in fact, they move pretty fast around the corner, I’ve found when crossing with my kids.

Happily, if Etobicoke York Community Council approves, the city will be installing stop signs at the intersection. The EYCC will consider the proposal on July 14.

ActiveTO Quiet Streets launch dead on arrival.

Toronto the Careful™ has struck again.

Call me jaded but the plan to open up Toronto’s streets to pedestrians and cyclists seems to be (like most council actions in our fair city) massively underwhelming and certainly in Ward 5 the selection of streets doesn’t seem to address the spirit of the initiative. The idea was to ensure that, “people have space to get around on sidewalks while respecting physical distancing“. 

57 km or a minuscule 1.7% of Toronto’s 3,322 km of neighbourhood streets (excludes expressways, arterial and collector roads) will be temporarily signed and barricaded off to all but local traffic. York South-Weston is giving this treatment to 3.7 kilometres of its streets. Sadly none are in Weston or Mount Dennis.

The Ward 5 closed off streets will be:

StreetFromToLength
Bicknell AveRogers RdEglinton Ave 0.9 km
Silverthorn AveSt. Clair Ave WDonald Ave 

Total of 2.8 km

Donald AveSilverthorn AveHaverson Blvd
Haverson BlvdDonald AveCameron Ave
Blackthorn AveCameron AveEglinton Ave W

Source: Councillor Nunziata’s May 13 COVID Update.

Council felt the need to do something, and something, albeit timid and careful has been done. At least they restrained themselves from calling it a pilot. Additional streets will be considered ‘thereafter’.

The affected streets are shown with red dotted lines. Click to enlarge. Adapted from Google Maps.

According to Councillor Nunziata’s update, the criteria for selection of these streets was, “…several factors including, but not limited to, population density, equity, access to greenspace, car ownership rates, and traffic volumes.“. The councillor’s selection appears to be entirely inside her newly acquired constituency – Frank DiGiorgio’s  former Ward 12 so perhaps this is a little nod to them.

Incidentally, all but one of the selected streets have sidewalks on both sides so it’s hard to imagine crowds of people jostling for space.

Looking south from where Blackthorn Ave and Haverson Blvd meet at Cameron Ave. From Google Maps.

Readers are invited to suggest locations in Weston and Mount Dennis that might be more suitable. We will forward them to the councillor for future consideration.

Update: The city has published their list of ‘Quiet Streets’ and the Ward 5 selections are nowhere to be seen.

Crosswalk coming to to Eglinton, speed humps to John

The city will install a crosswalk on Eglinton where an elderly woman was struck and killed trying to cross. According to Toronto.com

York-South Weston Coun. Frances Nunziata requested the city install the pedestrian crossing on Eglinton Avenue West, 100 metres west of Pearen Street in order to address an 800-metre gap between protected pedestrian crossings on that stretch. Council approved the signalized crossing in a meeting on Jan. 29. No firm date was set for installation.

In related news, Etobicoke York Community Council has overruled city staff and asked the city to install speed humps on John Street between Pine and Elm. When surveyed, 59% of respondents said that they were in favour. To recommend humps, city staff require 60% approval. Four councillors, including Nunziata, voted in favour of the humps. One councillor, Stephen Holyday, voted against them.