Fact-findings on fibs, fabrications, and falsities.

Today, the first of what I fear will be many fact-findings on fibs, fabrications, and falsities.

First, Ahmed Hussen. Hussen made an outrageous and false accusation on July 1 that came to light this week. He accused the Conservatives of “dancing with racists” at a speech on Canada Day, which is also Somalian Independence Day. The Post Millennial picked up the story today.

Hussen told a crowd:

in an election year, one of the main responsibilities is what? To vote. And vote for the right leaders, the real leaders that bring people together, not divide you, not dance with white supremacists, but actually bring people together and confront hatred, confront Islamophobia, and prove once again that Canada is the best country in the world by making sure that everyone is represented.

Hussen has a history of baiting conservatives. He said that Lisa MacLeod’s criticism of his department  was “irresponsible, it’s divisive, it’s fear-mongering and it’s not Canadian and it is very dangerous.” He’s also said that the Conservatives want to “militarize” the border. He’s long blamed the Conservatives for the problems in his department.

But implying last month that Conservatives would “dance with white supremacists” is an ugly slander. It is, in fact, irresponsible, divisive, and fear-mongering.

Yafet Tewelde said this week:

Not quite so. The lead author of this section of the IPCC report says this:

 Please stop saying something globally bad is going to happen in 2030. Bad stuff is already happening and every half a degree of warming matters, but the IPCC does not draw a “planetary boundary” at 1.5°C beyond which lie climate dragons.

[If] we don’t halve emissions by 2030, will we have lost the battle and just have to hunker down and survive? Of course not.

No scientist I’ve read says that the next decades aren’t critical. None, though, says that there is a threshold in 2030. It’s more complicated than 240 characters allow.

Finally, Jasveen Rattan said that

Happily, I don’t have to wade through tax policy to figure the truth of this out. The Economist covered it last week. They said there’ve been tax cuts for the working and middle classes (and deficits for our children):

 To stimulate growth [Trudeau] let a near-balanced budget move into deficit…. Most important, he has put money into the pockets of people on middle and low incomes. A means-tested child-benefit programme gives families on the lowest incomes C$5,600-6,600 a year per child.

More moolah came from cutting the tax rate on the bottom income bracket and raising it for the richest 1%. The government expanded a tax credit for workers on low incomes. Its critics claim that middle-class families are worse off because it took away some tax credits. In fact, says Mr Morneau, the finance minister, a family of four at the median-income level is C$2,000 better off

Technically, there have been small tax hikes: on the rich, and on carbon. But neither of these tax increases hurt the median Canadian.  Rattan’s statement then isn’t entirely false, but it’s pretty close.

Author: Adam Norman

I am raising my two children in Weston.

One thought on “Fact-findings on fibs, fabrications, and falsities.”

  1. Wow! Thank you for giving these assertions context and the facts.

    This kind of informed assessment is what is needed when dramatic sweeping statements.

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