Kodak Lands Generator – the issues and a solution

The Kodak Lands as they currently exist.
A map of the Kodak Lands as they currently exist.

Let me add a further two cents to this debate as I have been missing in action for a while thanks to some nasty post Christmas bugs that have laid the Murray household low.

There has been some controversy over what will be placed on the Kodak Lands at Eglinton and Black Creek. There was dismay when Metrolinx announced that the site was to be a storage yard for the Eglinton Crosstown LRT. More recently further disappointment was the response to the surprise announcement that an electrical generating station would be built on the lands. This would allegedly fire up in the event of a power failure. As a response, there were calls to make the generating station produce power from ‘green’ sources.

There are main three issues to the story;

  1. Whether or not a generator should be built on the former Kodak Lands
  2. The ‘greenness’ of the generator
  3. Whether there will be ’emergency only’ or a daily use of the generator

1. Let’s agree that a generator is a terrible use of the Kodak lands – it’s bad enough to have a storage yard occupy this precious green space. Unfortunately it’s likely a done deal so let’s move to the second point.

2. As I mentioned in a previous article, green power is in its infancy with the main barriers being the unreliable nature of solar and wind power. Storage is therefore needed for these unreliable and expensive green sources and even then, there would be days, especially in winter when sunlight and wind would be absent.

3. With the prospect of a daily firing up of the generator, all bets are off. A daily emission of carbon dioxide and particulate matter from burning natural gas would be produced. This would be done when electricity is at its most expensive, namely during rush hours, adding to pollution from cars and factories.

Bottom line; A generator is a bad idea. If Metrolinx is insistent on having a generator, the community should fight tooth and nail to ensure that it will be used for emergencies only. It should not be used to provide cheap electricity on a daily basis.

Solution: Large Scale Storage

With compact and reasonably priced electrical storage, a generator isn’t needed; just a series of very large battery modules that would be charged overnight when, as Adam has shown, there is oodles of very cheap industrial electricity (produced mainly from non-polluting hydro and nuclear sources). As technology stands at the moment, large scale batteries or indeed other storage methods are expensive but then, so is a gas-powered generator and the pollution it creates. Storage is expected to rapidly become cheaper as technology improves.

Bottom Line

If Metrolinx really wants a community based solution and daily, inexpensive, pollution-free electricity, the better bet would be a large scale battery that would soak up virtually free industrial electricity overnight for use in peak periods during the day. This pollution-free solution would not need to be on the Kodak Lands but could be on an industrial site anywhere along the line. This could demonstrate Metrolinx’ commitment to a greener energy, the Weston-Mount Dennis community and a willingness to adopt an exciting new technology.

I’m charged up about this.