Woman arrested for stabbing at Weston and Lawrence

The police have arrested a woman for a non-fatal stabbing at Weston and Lawrence.

The victim was taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries. Distressingly, CityNews says that the victim and perpetrator were not known to each other. The alleged perpetrator appears to have been arrested almost immediately.

1 person in custody after stabbing at Weston and Lawrence

Hassan hosting meeting on autism programs

Faisal Hassan, our MPP, will be hosting a community meeting on the cuts to autism services. The meeting will be this Saturday, at 2 pm, at the Jane Street Hub.

The Progressive Conservative government is reimagining the province’s autism plan, and replacing money given to health agencies with money given to parents. The goal is to reduce waiting lists, but a side-effect will be reduced funding for those already receiving services.

Man arrested for violent robbery, bank robberies

Toronto police arrested Bevon McDermott, 57, for a dangerous convenience store robbery in Weston and two bank robberies.

McDermott is alleged to have robbed a convenience store near Chuch and Weston Road on February 11. Wearing a mask and carrying a handgun he

made a verbal demand for cash, lottery tickets and cigarettes and ordered the store employee to place the items inside a gym bag he had brought with him

McDermott is also alleged to have robbed a bank near Wincott and Eglinton and a bank near St Clair and Jane, both on February 15. In at least one of those cases, he is alleged to have held a gun to a teller’s head.

 

And finally

It’s been a fun photographic evening on WestonWeb. One more to go, with an an idea almost as old as the bike.

The photo below just appeared on the Toronto Public Library’s excellent photo stream. It shows Mike Barry, the recently-deceased father of Canadian cycling, riding a penny farthing.

From the TPL

The caption is:

Home of the bicycle: “Mike Barry rides a penny farthing, built in the late 1800s. Some Weston residents are hoping Weston will one day have a national cycling museum and hall of fame.”

The photo, and the article it accompanied, are from 1988.

30 years ago, the Weston BIA hatched a plan, hosted the first (and probably last) Weston Criterium, and started working on a mobile museum. They christened Weston “the home of the bicycle” and hoped to have a permanent museum underway within four years.

Clearly, it didn’t work.

But you know, the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second-best time is today.

I think a cycling museum and hall of fame in Weston is a damned fine idea. Canada has a fine history of bike building and racing–and some of the best bikes in the world are still made here–but I don’t think there’s a proper museum anywhere in the country.

Norco, CCM, Rocky Mountain, Devinci, Mariposa and Cervélo are all Canadian brands, as are Cannondale, GT and Schwinn.

And bikes are beautiful. Sure, I’m a little biased, but I’d visit. Am I crazy?

Upcoming events

Tomorrow, the Pearen Park skating rinks will have extended hours to celebrate Family Day.


On February 22nd, UrbanArts will celebrate Black History Month with “The Colour Black: Where ART & MIGRATION Meets”

And would you look at that graphic design? Wow.

Astonishing historical letters

The Weston Historical Society posted a link to The Canadian Letters and Images Project, which preserves letters from soldiers serving abroad.

One group of letters is from Bert Irwin, who was born in Weston. Irwin enlisted in 1915, and his brief letters are sad, occasionally charming, and completely terrifying. You must read them.

Irwin never seems to have believed in glory and honour of war. In a letter from what he calls “Hell” (his family looks to have added “Somme” to the top of the page letter, in pen) only four months into his time in Europe, he tells his parents, on small, pencilled pages, about a few of the things he has seen:

A big High explosive came near me and the flash and powder kind of got my goat and I thought I saw a big hole. I floundered into it on my head and it was only about a foot deep. I was like an ostrich then trying to bury my head in the mud. Just as I hit the bottom a big “dud” unexploded shell came over my shoulder half burying me. When I got back down the line to the old position it was all torn up but one dug out and two fellows were wounded and one shell shocked. I thought I was due for that but I didnt get it. I dont make any bones about saying Im darn scared of shells and anyone who says differently hasnt been there. Yesterday I was filling sand bags and I noticed a mule team on the cusp of the hill. The drivers were dismounted and seemed to be lost. I said to a fellow beside me, “They hadnt better stay there long” Just as said it a shell lit behind the waggon and scared them. They mounted and started off at the trot. I thought to myself “they’re getting out lucky” when a big fritz came shrieking down right into the centre of them. Five mules and two drivers were blown completely The other mule stood there and “hee hawd.” One leg was blown off. Somebody ran over and shot him.

These are the things he would share with his mother.

Irwin survived the Battle of the Somme–as well as Passchendaele and Vimy–and stayed at the front for two more years.


It wasn’t all horror. In June of 1918, Irwin wrestled another Canadian, and took joy in the licking he received:

I was in a wrestling bout for the Brigade yesterday. Went up against a fellow from B.C. who had one time been middleweight champion of Canada (I found this out after) Well I’m not ashamed to say he trimmed me up because he had the Science. All I’ve got is an imposing pose. I had him beat in that anyhow… I stuck it out for another round after that but he got me in the finish. So, bar having a lump on my forehead like an egg and a feeling all over like Id been skinned alive with a razor I dont feel too bad.

He was also arrested in Bologne for impersonating a sergeant so that he could ride in a better carriage.


In the last letters he wrote, he describes being hit.

He seems relieved–and seems to even wish his old friend, Cecil, who carried him to the dressing station–had been hit, too. ” I hope Cecil doesn’t get it”, he says. “I hated to see him go back.”

In the last sentence, of the last letter, he says, “I am in a fine hospital and am going to take my time getting better.”