More events!

Whoops! Missed a few! It’s going to be a busy month!

The annual Weston Memorial June Fair will be Thursday, June 8th. It is, guaranteed, the most fun your kids will have at school. And that’s saying something!

Volunteers are always welcome to help out with setup and takedown. Youth can get volunteer hours, and tall people are particularly useful, I can tell you from personal experience, for help setting up the tents.


12 Division Police will have its annual Community Day on Sunday, June 11 from 1–4 pm at 200 Trethewey Dr. There will be a barbecue, entertainment, face-painting and more.


The Weston Neighbours’ Night Out will be Friday, June 23, in Elm Park. It’s always a blast, with live music, a barbecue, and hundreds of kids going crazy in the park. Don’t miss it!

Official build of STJE begins

The sod was turned and construction officially began for the new St John the Evangelist school last Wednesday.

The new school should be finished in time for September, 2018, and it sounds fantastic. The kids will have more space, a large outdoor playground on top of the UPX tunnel, and air conditioning. In the 21st century!

Sod turning group photo
Photo from the BIA

Upcoming events

Next Saturday will be the annual Queens Drive garage sale. It’s always fantastic.


UrbanArts will be presenting a dance competition: “The Throwdown” on Friday, June 16. Tickets are still available.


The grand opening of the Weston Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, June 17.


 

 

 

Nunziata apologizes to Mammoliti

Our councillor Frances Nunziata occupies the speaker’s chair during council meetings. It’s a lot of work. Things sometimes get testy and having to deal with the effervescent streams of consciousness mouthed by neighbouring councillor Giorgio Mammoliti is no easy task.

Last week the two had an exchange and the result is interesting. Watch Ms. Nunziata call out Mammo and tell him to keep his mouth shut. After some reflection, kindred spirit, Councillor Jim Karygiannis then leaps to Mammoliti’s defence.

After that, watch Mayor Tory coach Councillor Nunziata into an apology. It takes some persistence on his part but eventually the mayor’s lip synching gets through and a grudging apology is issued.

Watch the sorry spectacle unfold here.

 

Mount Dennis CIBC Banking Centre to close

The Mount Dennis CIBC Banking Centre

According to the CIBC website, the CIBC Banking Centre at 1174 Weston Road will close on Friday, October 20, 2017 at 1:00pm and merge with the Keele and Saint Clair Banking Centre 3 km away. Despite big banks’ record profits, there is an ongoing trend to close and consolidate branches. Weston’s Scotiabank branch closed last year.

Who will be affected most by this? People in the neighbourhood who walk to the branch or even worse, those who are uncomfortable with or cannot afford computers; namely the poor and the elderly.

One wonders, if payday loan companies can afford to have branches on every corner, why can’t the big banks?

CIBC would like you to move your banking to here.

Banks know that customers are loath to change from one bank to another and feel that cutting service (and jobs) is better for business than serving people where they live.

Mount Dennis CIBC customers may wish to move their business elsewhere. Credit unions are noted for their customer service and would be happy to welcome new clients. If you have to use the car anyway…

Great news and bad news.

It’s well known that many more people in Toronto would cycle if they were isolated and safe from other traffic. The Ontario Government announced today that it will be spending up to $42.5 million on cycling infrastructure across the province. According to Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca, the Ontario Municipal Cycling Commuter Program aims to, “promote safety for cyclists and make cycling more comfortable and more appealing for daily commutes and other frequent trips”. The Ministry has also set up a website to promote cycling. This is great news as York South Weston is one of the most under-served wards in the city when it comes to separated bike lanes. As pointed out in a previous article, a few sharrows are the main concession to cycling in the Weston, Mount-Dennis area.

Toronto Council and the mayor were no doubt horrified and shamed by the recent tragic death of a five year-old riding with a parent in a separate but unprotected lane adjacent to busy traffic. This lane should have been physically separated from Lakeshore Road traffic had the city followed its own guidelines. The fact that it wasn’t is an indication of the low esteem in which cyclists and their safety are held in the city. The Mayor has offered to dither study the matter once more – a familiar council tactic designed to do nothing after the clamour for action has died down.

The lack of separation is contrary to the city’s own guidelines. From the Toronto Star.

Instead, Mayor Tory may wish to actually read the city’s existing guidelines concerning cycle trails in the city. I’ve saved him the bother of doing a ‘study’ by quoting the relevant section.

6.4.1. Trails Adjacent High-Volume or High-Speed Arterial Roadways

High-volume and high-speed roadways may have space for trails in the lands dedicated to them. Generally,

these are roadways with speeds of 60 km/h or more and four or more lanes of traffic. These types of roadways often do not have sidewalks, and a trail adjacent should be planned in a similar manner as a trail within a dedicated right-of-way.

The conflict between high-speed traffic and trail uses is best addressed by distance. Designers should try to achieve the maximum distance between the trail and the roadway. Aligning trails at the maximum distance from the roadway will also help to “future-proof” the trail against road expansions.

Where an appropriate distance cannot be achieved, guide rails and a physical separation such as a fence or landscaping are recommended.*

*my bold.

Toronto City Council has a large number of car-centric members. Read here (and weep) for some of our elected officials opining on two-wheeled transportation.

So the bad news is therefore that any spending has to be approved by individual members of Toronto City Council. Let’s hope it won’t take any more lives before some concrete and meaningful action is taken. With the province providing up to 80% of the funding, there will no longer be a valid excuse not to act.