Weston icon for sale

The Olympic Variety building, but not the business, is for sale for just shy of a million dollars. The owners of the variety store and office will stay “or vacate”, and the building could, the listing says, be converted into a medical or law office.

Your humble correspondent would be heartbroken if May and Steven left. Olympic Variety is a community fixture and my pantry.

Olympic Variety

Thanks to L for the tip.

 

 

 

 

 

Metrolinx seeking your input

Metrolinx is seeking your blessing, permission, input, cover as they start a round of consultation on their “community charter” . They say they are

working hard to put residents and communities at the very centre of everything we do.

The charter is “to give meaningful and measureable [sic] form to our commitment to communities”.

Weston has long been railroaded by the provincial transportation organization. Off the top of my head, they:

  • Spent $500 million+ on the jet-setting elites even though they knew it was a dud
  • Expropriated homes while denying that they were doing so
  • Wasted gob-smacking amounts of money
  • Delayed opening the long-overdue pedestrian bridge
  • Screwed up building noise walls in our community
  • And continue to publish, of all things, an in-ride magazine for a money-losing train
UP Express magazine
Sweet christ. These are your tax dollars at work.

all while having plenty of community consultations on exactly what colours the deck chairs should be.

If, unlike me, you think that Metrolinx still has moral net assets, you can give your opinion.

Cops should be where they’re needed.

The Toronto Police report optimistically named, ‘The Way Forward‘ is running into flak from police union head Mike McCormack.  One of the suggestions in the report is to deploy officers in low crime areas to parts of the city where criminal behaviour is more prevalent. McCormack claims that after spending time to get to know a community, cops moved to other areas will be strangers. This apparently will negate all the good feelings engendered by community barbecues and the like.

Contrary to his new found love of community policing, McCormack was a fan of ‘carding‘. The practice of profiling, questioning and documenting people based on factors arbitrarily determined by an officer. Incredibly, while carding was abolished this year, data gathered in the past (some of it obtained illegally) has been retained. Carding did little to prevent crime but did much to alienate visible minorities. When I was young, many years ago I was profiled because of my youth, especially when driving. I can only imagine what it’s like to be young and black where profiling is practised.

Here in Weston it would be nice to see a few extra cops occasionally. Despite our fearsome reputation, we’re not a hotbed of crime. Although dealing drugs at 2 a.m. anywhere in the city is going to be bad for your health, the downtown waterfront is a far more dangerous place than Jane and Lawrence in the wee small hours.

The old saying goes that you can catch a lot more flies with honey than vinegar. Back in the 20th Century, police would be visible in neighbourhoods. They talked to people and patrolled where they were needed.

It’s just as well McCormack doesn’t have anything to do with fire services. The same way that it’s a good idea to put fire fighters where the fires are, let’s put cops where they’re needed, not where they’re comfortable.

Lions Park steps almost ready.

The view from the top and the first of the two ‘decks’.

The much delayed steps that lead from Hickory Tree Road down to the soccer pitch are almost ready. The steps replace an old wooden set that was falling apart and required constant maintenance. I spoke to a worker who told me that they should be completed by the end of the week.

The steps were made in sections and shipped from Ayr, Ontario. They have been redesigned somewhat and apart from being wider, now have two ‘decks’ which will see double duty as observation platforms when soccer games are in progress. They will make life easier for people walking between Weston and Etobicoke. Unlike the steps further up the Humber at St. Phillip’s Road, there is no bicycle track up these.

Correction made on 26 February, 2017: Since these photographs were taken, workers have begun to install what looks like bike channels along with wooden handrails on either side of the stairs.

The new steps from the soccer pitch.

Hussen profile in Macleans

Macleans has a very flattering profile of our MP, Ahmed Hussen.

From Macleans

It’s virtually impossible to imagine a way in which the 40-year-old could be better suited to the cabinet job he now holds. He came to Canada fleeing the Somali civil war, and subsequently lived in Regent Park, a once-troubled and isolated downtown Toronto public housing project he would help rejuvenate and repatriate to the residents when redevelopment came calling. Later, he opened a law practice focusing on immigration law and criminal cases, particularly for young offenders.