Jarryl Hagley’s murderers get life sentences

The murderers of Jarryl Hagley, 17, at the Weston Pizza Pizza will serve at least 25 years in prison before they get the chance for parole. Brothers Lenneil and Shakiyl Shaw, both 25, and Mohamed Ali-Nur, 21, were convicted of first-degree murder two weeks ago and sentenced today.

The Hagley’s family and friends read their victim impact statements for several hours before the judge sentenced them.

Hagley was killed in late 2016 while he sat with friends in the Pizza Pizza. The murderers charged into the restaurant and shot at him with a shotgun and a pistol. Hagley was shot in the chest.

The killers’ escape was caught on video, and they were convicted in part on the testimony of an accomplice, whose car was used in the crime.

Electric bus on Jane

Jane Street buses can be packed and infrequent—but we do get a bit of a treat. The TTC is running its first all-electric bus on 35 Jane.

The TTC is spending $140 million on 60 electric buses that should start running by early 2020. The bus on Jane is from one of the three vendors being tested.

electric bus
Photo from the TTC

The bus has a range of about 200 km, and each trip on Jane is about 78 km. The recharge time is about three hours.

 

Hurricane Hazel through home movies

SCANNED FROM THE TORONTO STAR LIBRARY
*U42 GRAPHIC Hurricane Hazel. Damage on Raymore Drive. Photo montage by Eric Cole and Ed Parker.

An evening of home movies shot by people who experienced the horror of Hurricane Hazel is being presented by the Weston Historical Society and Heritage York. The movies from 1954, give an insight, not only into the power of the most famous storm ever to hit Toronto but illustrate lifestyle aspects of Weston’s population some 65 years ago.

According to the WHS,

“On the night of Oct 15 1954 Hurricane Hazel struck Toronto, fatally flooding the Humber river valley (including 35 deaths on one street alone). Home movies shot the next morning showing the damage and the river still in high flood at Weston, are the starting point for our tour through the life and times of the city’s west-end. Local residents captured everything from the danger and high drama of floods, explosions and derailments – to the intimate drama of backyard ice rinks, rec room parties, a first communion filmed by nuns, parades, and the fashions and furnishings of the era.

Organized and presented with the Weston Historical Society and Heritage York.  “the Home Movie History Project”.”

Date: Wednesday June 5

Place: The ‘Village of Humber Heights’, 2245 Lawrence Ave W

Time: 7:30pm

Upcoming events

Weston Memorial’s annual June Fair will be Thursday, June 6. It’s always a blast.


The Queens Drive Garage sale will be Saturday, June 8. If you’ve never been, you must. It’s a wonderful Weston tradition.


The Black Creek Alliance is hosting a community fair on Sunday, June 9. There will be live music! Sounds great.


UrbanArts has announced a new program for seniors: ‘1000 Words’ will run every Tuesday at 1 pm at the York West Active Living Centre.

The ‘1000 Words’ project is an arts-based storytelling program that will enable seniors to share their life experiences through a variety of artistic disciplines. Seniors will reflect on the past, present and future through a variety of arts including collage-making, illustrations, mixed media painting and photography. All workshops will be facilitated by a trained arts professional. The program will culminate in an exhibition that will be open to the public and feature the works created by the seniors alongside portraits taken by youth throughout the project.

A Taste of Weston IB – Celebrating Community and Cultural Pride

On May 29th, 2019, the Weston Collegiate International Baccalaureate celebrated their 14th annual Taste of Weston with a Multicultural Twist.

This is the poster for the 14th annual Weston IB Multicultural night.

This event is a celebration of IB students completing their exams, as well as an event to build community, within the school and with the surrounding neighbourhood. Houses in the neighbourhood received flyers a few weeks prior to the event, inviting them to share in the celebration.

The event featured a variety of different cultural foods, with samosas being the hot ticket item, and cookies baked by the grade 11 students for a science class project. The event also featured a fashion show, showcasing traditional dress from different places and cultures, a raffle, and a talent show to finish out the night.

I have been to seven IB nights in my career, and I can honestly say, it is something to behold. The students come together to create a wonderful, accepting atmosphere, and all for a good cause. All the money raised goes towards the IB program in the school, which as you may have seen in this article, will have their funding cut in the upcoming TDSB budget. 

Through the hard work of students, teachers and volunteers, this event continues to run and change every year to suit the current culture at the school. A group of students who helped to organize the event said that organizing the event was a collective effort, and would not have been possible without everyone involved and went on to say “the great thing about being in IB is creating a family and that is what pushes us to organize events and bring people in. This family is like no other.”

Weston Students who helped organize IB night 2019 show off their cultural dress at the event.

This is an event that happens annually at the end of May. Please do consider joining them and supporting the students in the future, as these students are the future for our community.

York Memo community must make tough choice

City News reports that York Memorial community members have to make a tough choice: should they stay at George Harvey, just down the street, or go to Scarlett Heights, which is empty but farther away?

School map

If they move, they could have their own space, but fewer amenities. If they stay, they’ll have to “share specialized rooms like science labs, art rooms, gyms, the library, cafeteria and pool”.

Either way, the TDSB must make plans over the summer for the fall. They are currently gathering opinions to submit to the board.

Displaced York Memorial community must choose new home

 

Mount Dennis in the news

The Urban Land Institute (a non-profit planners’ group) has been working on ideas to revitalize Mount Dennis. Their results made the Globe and Mail  and the Toronto Star.

The short story: everybody is on board for a more prosperous, better-connected Mount Dennis. Alex Bozikovic wrote in the Globe:

Spread new growth across the neighbourhood. Focus on jobs and mix up jobs with some housing. Bring lots of people to live near transit. It sounds simple, but would require some changes to the city’s usual planning approach.

Interestingly, many locals are on board with this agenda. Mike Mattos, who heads the Mount Dennis Community Association, says the group largely welcomes the ULI proposals and, in places, development. “We need more people in the area,” he told me. “We don’t think the retail strip is going to survive with the current population. And we need more of the right kinds of jobs.” With all that, and some inventive policy, this could become a more prosperous place without becoming any less interesting.