Derelict houses to (finally) be destroyed

Frances Nunziata’s office says that the derelict houses at 2270 and 2274 Weston road, which have been an eyesore and hazard for more than a decade, will finally be demolished to make way for a  12-storey apartment building.

One of the two derelict houses
One of the two derelict houses

After years and years of waiting, an application has finally been submitted to the City to demolish the two derelict houses located at 2270 and 2274 Weston Road, which have long been an eyesore in the community for many years. I am pleased to update you that a demolition permit has been submitted to tear down these two buildings. In 2015, the owners received approval to construct a 12-storey apartment building. The project is going through the site plan approval process.

 

9 years later, two houses remain dangerous eye-sores

There are two buildings in Weston that really get under my skin. Every time I see them, they upset me.

They’re the houses at 2276 and 2274 (or so) Weston Road. For much more than a decade, they’ve been falling down. They’re patently dangerous, but since I’ve lived here they’ve remained standing—becoming ever more hazardous and ever uglier.

Nine years ago
Today

Today, on my way to pick up dinner, I thought I’d stop by. There’s a fence, after

It’s a little hard to tell, but this is the view *through* the front window. That’s snow and daylight.

a fashion, on the front of the property—but it has gaps, and there’s nothing at all on the side of the property.

The roof and first storey on the rightmost building has fallen in, and it’s possible to see daylight and snow in the house. The porch roof, too, has collapsed. The roof of the taller building is collapsing, and it looks like someone has been prying at the boarding on the back.

I am not a lawyer, but the half-hearted  fencing and missing boarding both seem to be bylaw violations. The city says that all vacant buildings must be securely boarded up and that the owners of hazardous buildings “shall erect and maintain fencing to prevent access to the property.” The fencing is supposed to be made permanent if work isn’t being done on the building.

There are larger issues: it’s not at all clear why, even after 10 years, the bylaws aren’t being enforced.

It’s especially unclear why the city allows houses to fall down—and to drag property values with them. I once got a whopping ticket for putting out my trash on the wrong day, but it seems that allowing my whole property to become a dump would be a-okay.

And it’s totally opaque to me why we—you and I—haven’t complained until these homes got fixed. Those houses are a necrotic spot on Weston’s artery.  Did we stop noticing the ache? Were we hoping it would pass?