Janes Walk follows Carrying Place route

John Graves Simcoe. From Toronto Dreams Project

This Saturday (tomorrow) Swansea Historical Society will conduct a Janes Walk in two halves which will take participants from South Kingsway all the way up to the Eglinton Flats in Weston / Mount Dennis. The walk will begin with ‘Lt. Governor John Graves Simcoe’ accompanying walkers at 9:30 am from South Kingsway to Bloor (approximately 12 noon) and will continue at 1:00 pm after participants have found their own lunch.

From https://taiaiakon.wordpress.com/2012/09/19/taiaiaikon/

The second half will begin at the Alex Ling fountain at the north-west corner of Bloor and Jane and will last about 3 hours, ending at the Eglinton Flats; site of the 1793 camp where the Humber now meets Eglinton.

More details and an interactive map can be found on the Janeswalk.org site.

Two more murals about to be painted

Artist Jason Baerg. Source: jasonbaerg.com

Urban Arts will be completing two new local murals this month. One will be under the Lawrence Avenue bridge and the other under the Scarlett Road bridge. These will be viewable by pedestrians and cyclists and will have an indigenous people theme. Cree Métis artist Jason Baerg, and his team of mural painters presented ideas for comments last night at the Weston Library. Both murals will be painted on long and narrow bridge abutments that run under the respective roads with a stylized thunderbird theme for the Lawrence bridge and a sweetgrass theme for the Scarlett location.

The indigenous people theme is particularly appropriate since the Carrying Place Trail ran alongside the Humber for thousands of years before European settlement of the Weston area.

The Carrying Place Trail Plaque at Little Avenue and Weston Road at its unveiling in 2013.

Progress reports will be forthcoming.

Local blogger ponders Weston bone discovery.

Hans Havermann has lived in Weston for more than half a century and writes a blog mainly about mathematics and puzzles. Occasionally Hans turns his powerful mind to local thoughts and happenings such as the Denison Road underpass, his neighbourhood,  and Raymore Park. Like Weston Web, his blog has been going since 2010 and helpfully, articles are accessible by date and title so that readers can comb through the archives. This is a great site if you’re a fan of math and puzzles; an added bonus is the content of local interest.

Once Hans gets his teeth into something, he’s relentless. Sparked by a WestonWeb article on the proposed Wilby Crescent apartments, he wondered why its address is on Wilby rather than Hickory Tree where maps clearly place it. While looking for older maps of the ever changing streets of Weston, he found an article on the above photograph of bones discovered near Weston Road, south of Lawrence and decided to do some digging of his own (yes, I know). As a result of his research, he believes that the site of the bones was not as commonly believed at Weston Park Baptist Church but on a now demolished church property across the street on Bellevue.

You might want to subscribe to Hans’ blog and if you can help in his quest for more information, he’d be very interested.