What do we want?

Last week, I made a case that we should have a commercial relationship with all the new builders in Weston. They want to break the planning guidelines. I think they should pay to do so.

I also asked how you thought the (as-yet-imaginary) money should be spent. 59 people responded. Thank you! Here are the results. (They don’t add up to 59 because people could vote for more than one option.)

Many people noted that the new-new Farmers’ Market isn’t looking good and asked for a new-new-new one. That wasn’t the most popular option though: the most people voted for a YMCA-style space. I too think that would be just fantastic. Tied for third were a recreation space for young people and a scholarship fund. Damned fine ideas, if I do say so myself.

Peering into the data, I think we could safely say that a YMCA-style space would be just super, because it could provide all of the top options, as well as a few of the less popular ones:

  • Programming for youth
  • A stuff-bank for tools, food, clothing, and computers
  • Another, closer, and perhaps less popular gym
  • Perhaps even a community daycare, which we have been missing for six years

 

 

Daycare at Pelmo PS–coming soonish

Pelmo Park Public School has asked the city for permission to build a  4000-square-foot single-storey daycare attached to the main school building.

According to Chris Tonks, the centre will hold 49 children, from infant through to preschool, and will accept city subsidies. It won’t, however, open until after 2021.

 

Tonks says that Weston Memorial has also been approved for funding for a 49-spot daycare. It, too, is in the early stages of the process, and will not open until at least 2021. Still, this is great news; Weston has not had an institutional daycare since we lost Weston Village Childcare 5 years ago.

 

Sullivan meeting on childcare

Mike Sullivan will be hosting a meeting on childcare this Tuesday—a topical issue, given that Weston Village Childcare is in mortal danger. Olivia Chow will attend.

A pro tip: guests might consider asking about the NDP’s commitment to universal childcare. Jack Layton’s NDP brought down the minority Martin governmennt when we we on the cusp of actually getting childcare for all.

Layton, simply by letting things happen, could have helped deliver the policy that offered the single best reason to vote for a socialist government. But instead of taking a solid gain for working families, Layton concentrated on developing the NDP around his own personality.