Meeting about severing 135 John

Nunziata’s office will be hosting a meeting to consider whether the owner of 135 John should be allowed to sever the lot and construct two new homes, with 8m wide lots.

The meeting will be at 7 pm on Monday, January 29 at Weston Memorial, . The owners will be there to present their case.

The OMB recently recently rejected a similar case just down the street at 96 John, in which the owners had asked to create two 7.5m lots. That appeal was denied on the grounds that the smaller lots would destabilize the character of the neighbourhood.


Vote for $20,000 for Frontlines

Frontlines hopes you’ll vote for them to receive a $20,000 grant for their Frontburners youth kitchen.

Youth at Frontlines; picture from @FrontlinesTO
Youth at Frontlines; picture from @FrontlinesTO

Frontburners helps young people from 18-29 learn with “hands-on training in the kitchen, in-class instruction and food handling training and assist them with finding employment”. Participants also cook for the kids from 6-12 in the after-school programs, and “facilitate workshops to teach them about meal preparation and healthy eating”.

The grant is from’s charitable arm, and the competition is pretty stiff: 15 charitable food organizations across the country are competing—so don’t delay.

Frontlines has really been knocking it out of the park with their culinary skills programs. This week, they catered the local politician’s Holiday Open House (and they would be delighted to cater for your holiday event, too).

Province seeking input on payday loan shops

Frances Nunziata is asking for you to give the province input on payday loan, rent-to-own and cheque cashing stores—what she calls “predatory lenders”. The proposed changes would make payday loans less attractive.

financial institutions
A search for cheque-cashing shops

For payday loan shops, province is considering

  1. Extended payment periods for repeat borrowers
  2. Lowered lending limits
  3. An extended, six-day waiting period
  4. Clear display of the cost of borrowing and credit counselling information

Most intriguingly, the province is also asking that credit unions be exempt from these regulations.

You can provide feedback on all the proposed changes.


New park to be built in Mount Dennis?

The Mount Dennis Community Association showed the power of the people and got Frances Nunziata to look into creating a new park out of a “wasteland” at Brownville and Barr Ave.

A long-time vacant City owned lot on Brownville (beside the rail tracks opposite Barr Ave.) has been generating complaints from neighbours about accumulating litter, dog-poo and general lack of maintenance. The City’s Real Estate staff administer the site, and proposed to simply fence it in. But fifteen local residents showed up at an April 24 meeting with Councillor Nunziata at the Library, and most of them had other ideas. At the end of the meeting, the Councillor agreed to try and get the site transferred over to the Parks & Recreation Department as a first step towards upgrading it for community recreational activities. 

Frances Nunziata’s rightward tilt

How conservative is Frances Nunziata? She was besties with Rob Ford , who drove a mammoth Cadillac Escalade. She, however, drove a Prius. Fire-breather or tree-hugger? Morebucks or Warbucks? The answer has eluded me.

Here, then, for your edification are Frances Nunziata’s votes from the last city budget. Right-wing votes to cut spending are, naturally, Conservative blue. Left-wing votes to increase funding are NDP orange.


I only counted votes about actual money; a lot of City Council votes are asking a staffer to write a report about whether to spend money later. I ignored them.

My unscientific impression of the results: Nunziata isn’t as left-wing as  would like, but she’s more middle of the road than I had assumed.

Bike licensing is dead

From the city's  Virtual Reference Library
From the city’s Virtual Reference Library

Politics has gone mad: crazy, populist ideas now regularly trample thoughtfulness and reason. You might be pleasantly surprised, therefore, to hear that city politicians did something smart: they killed a plan to license bikes.

Our own councillor, however, who has long supported licensing, continues—against all evidence—to champion this dumb idea.

Earlier this year, Stephen Holyday asked the city to look (again) at licensing bikes, although is has done so several times and even has a FAQ on the topic. In short, licenses lose money, kids ride, and licensing—despite all the knee-jerking—is quite unnecessary: cyclists can be ticketed just fine without a license. (I should know.)

In the course of the debate at the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee, another really good point came up: a license is a regressive tax on the cheapest and best transportation:

And that, of course, is the real reason reactionaries want to license bikes: they want to discourage cycling.¹

Politicians can have long careers giving people things they like and passing laws against things they don’t—never minding the facts or principle. Bicyclists bug civilians. I know why: it’s because we’re better. We’re faster, fitter, richer, and happier. Clearly, then, our smugness should be banned.

And yes, we are unpredictable. We are dangerous. Can I tell you something? I ride without a helmet. I ride the wrong way. I ride fast, with headphones in, weaving and taking up lanes when I want to. I cut cars off. I turn left from the left turn lane. I give bad drivers the finger. And I’ve been doing it for decades. Do you know how many people I’ve hurt?



The truth is this: cars are dangerous to other people. Bikes are not. Bikes are kind to other people. We need more bikes, not fewer. We need to encourage them, not license them, not tax them.

Let’s hope this is the last time we hear of any dumb licensing scheme.²

¹The rest of this post is edited from a comment I left on Facebook; I said it well then when I wasn’t tired and overworked.

²And don’t even start: if I hear one more time that cyclists should “pay their fair share”, I’m going to key a Caddy. That is such bullshit.

Drivers should pay for pollution. They should pay for foreign wars, climate change, resource depletion, coastal spills, urban sprawl, visual blight, noise, ruined neighbourhoods, starless skies and interrupted street hockey too.

You know what I need to make it downtown on my bike? 45 minutes, a handful of chips, and a dirt path.

Pay my share? Oh, gladly.

Metrolinx to VIA: No dice.

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 3.18.09 PM
Oh the possibilities! VIA Rail’s route (in blue) from Union to London.

VIA Rail trains pass (without stopping) through Weston twice a day in each direction on their way from London to Toronto’s Union Station. Some passengers from London, Kitchener, Guelph, Stratford and other stations along the route are headed to Pearson and it seemed like a no-brainer for those passengers to simply exit at Weston and hop aboard the airport train thus saving themselves time and money. Another plus, Westonians would have another way to travel westwards along that route and even catch a ride to Union in the other direction twice daily.

Enter Metrolinx. Metrolinx has said no. Apparently the arrangement is too hard to accomplish because of tight scheduling, passengers would only have 60 seconds to get off the train. Compared to regular UPX stops of 30 seconds, this seems like quite a generous allocation; especially since few will likely be getting off.

Why the foot dragging from Metrolinx? Well for starters, that’s a precious revenue loss if passengers can get a cheaper fare to the airport from Weston. Second, it’s an inconvenience to have a tight schedule to worry about. Third, why bother; it’s only Weston.

Bottom line: Laura Albanese, Ahmed Hussen and Frances Nunziata should be screaming from the rooftops for Metrolinx to add this (however small) amenity to Weston. Larger scheduling problems have been solved in the past. According to an article in the Star, this decision is not carved in stone. Let’s hope that our representatives can bring some pressure to bear; soon.