Big Etobicoke York Community Council meeting

On January 5, the Etobicoke York Community Council will be having (what seems to me) a quite important meeting.

They will be discussing the “Picture Mount Dennis Planning Framework”, which will, among other things:

  • Amend the Official Plan and allow higher buildings near Weston road and the rail corridor
  • “Draft a Secondary Plan for Mount Dennis to establish a comprehensive planning framework”
  • “provide a new policy direction for Mount Dennis to support a transit oriented, complete community,
  • “Provide provisions”—no idea what that means—”for future parkland dedication and Privately Owned Publicly Accessible Spaces”
  • “Amend the Zoning By-law based on the recommendations of the report to… amend the zoning for lands… with a Neighbourhoods designation, establish maximum retail unit frontage length for new development on Weston Road; include maximum building heights, expressed in metres and number of storeys, for each character area; establish maximum retail sizes and amend zoning boundaries to resolve zoning inconsistencies.”

I’ll be honest: I don’t have the know-how or the time to figure this out. It’s a huge, 220-page, two part (1, 2) report. I’d love your help. If you can explain what this all means, email me.

Etobicoke York Community Council will also continue to consider two very large developments on January 5. One is on Hollis Drive and the other on Photography Drive.

The Hollis Drive proposed development is a 34-storey, 365-unit tower on a residential street.

The Photography Drive project is even bigger.

Community Council votes to send lawyers to fight tall building appeals

Etobicoke York Community Council approved a motion to send lawyers to the Ontario Land Tribunal to argue against building the proposed tall buildings at 1821–1823 Weston Road and 8–16 Locust Street.

The owners of 1821 Weston are proposing a 38-storey, 446-unit building that would, according to city staff, violate:

  • The Provincial policy statement
  • The Growth Plan
  • Toronto’s official plan
  • “Area specific and city wide guidelines”

City planners say it does not fit the local built form, is too close to property lines, and is “out of scale to its surroundings”, and will “negatively impact adjacent lands—among many other complaints.

Staff say,

Development on this site could be supported, if it provides appropriate setbacks, separation distances, massing, building height and density, as directed in the Official Plan, the Weston Urban Design Guidelines, and the City-Wide Tall Building Design Guidelines in cooperation with adjacent property owners.


City staff also oppose the 35-storey, 372-unit proposed building on Locust Street.

They say it violates:

  • The Provincial Policy Statement
  • The Growth Plan
  • Mount Dennis’ urban design guidelines

It is also, they say, too tall, too close to the property line, and out of context with the neighbouring buildings, again, among other complaints. “Given the existing and planned context for the subject property and the surrounding area, the proposed density, height and massing proposed in its current form cannot be supported by staff.”


In both cases, staff recommended “that City Council direct the City Solicitor, together with appropriate City staff, to oppose the current proposal at the OLT and continue discussions with the Applicant to resolve outstanding issues.”

Four-way stop at Walwyn and Chantilly Gardens to be considered

This week, Etobicoke York Community Council will consider a proposal to put a four-way stop at the corner of Walwyn and Chantilly. City staff say it doesn’t make sense because not nearly enough foot- and vehicular-traffic comes through the intersection. It is possible, however, they’ll be overruled.

And get this: staff say common sense ideas about traffic restrictions are completely wrong!

They say:

Empirical evidence shows that when all-way stop controls are installed at low volume locations such as this, they have minimal impact on reducing vehicle operating speeds or traffic volume, may encourage non-compliance, and will contribute to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and vehicle noise.

Neat!

Today’s Etobicoke York Council Decisions

Etobicoke York Council meets about once a month to deal with local issues. Local councillors discuss matters of local concern and adopt, defer or reject motions which are sent to the full council for adoption and enactment. Today’s decisions that may be of interest to our readers are:

Proposed apartment at 10 Wilby Crescent.

EYC recommends the following:

  1. Staff be directed to schedule a community consultation meeting for the lands at 10 Wilby Crescent together with the Ward Councillor.
  2. Notice for the community consultation meeting be given to landowners and residents within 120 metres of the site.
  3. Notice for the public meeting under the Planning Act be given according to the regulations of the Planning Act.

Decision: Adopted

8 Oak Street demolition

Toronto Building recommends that the City Council give consideration to the demolition application for 8 Oak Street and decide to:

Approve the application to demolish the two storey industrial building without entering into a beautification agreement with the City and the appropriate City officials be authorized and directed to take the necessary action to give effect thereto.

Decision: Amended

Update: The minutes don’t give details of the amendment yet, however, InsideToronto says that Councillor Nunziata asked for a heritage report on the building that will be delivered at the April EYC meeting.

Traffic Calming Poll Results – Rosemount Avenue

The Director, Transportation Services, Etobicoke York District recommends that:

Etobicoke York Community Council NOT to approve installing traffic calming on Rosemount Avenue.¹

Decision: Adopted

All-Way Stop Control – Rosemount Avenue and MacDonald Avenue

The Director, Transportation Services, Etobicoke York District recommends that:

Etobicoke York Community Council NOT approve the installation of all-way stop controls at the intersection of Rosemount Avenue and MacDonald Avenue.

Decision: Adopted

Pedestrian Access to City Laneway – Lawrence Avenue West to MacDonald Avenue

Transportation Services recommends that:

Etobicoke York Community Council NOT approve installing fencing across the laneway between MacDonald Avenue and Lawrence Avenue West, east of Ralph Street in order to block access to pedestrians.

Decision: Adopted


¹(Sorry, we reported this wrong. They did vote to approve speed humps.)