Janes Walk follows Carrying Place route

John Graves Simcoe. From Toronto Dreams Project

This Saturday (tomorrow) Swansea Historical Society will conduct a Janes Walk in two halves which will take participants from South Kingsway all the way up to the Eglinton Flats in Weston / Mount Dennis. The walk will begin with ‘Lt. Governor John Graves Simcoe’ accompanying walkers at 9:30 am from South Kingsway to Bloor (approximately 12 noon) and will continue at 1:00 pm after participants have found their own lunch.

From https://taiaiakon.wordpress.com/2012/09/19/taiaiaikon/

The second half will begin at the Alex Ling fountain at the north-west corner of Bloor and Jane and will last about 3 hours, ending at the Eglinton Flats; site of the 1793 camp where the Humber now meets Eglinton.

More details and an interactive map can be found on the Janeswalk.org site.

First Jane’s walk in Weston

The Weston Heritage Conservation District is organizing what your correspondent believes is the first-ever Weston Jane’s Walk.

Jane’s Walks are neighbourhood tours in honour of Jane Jacobs, urban planning critic and theorist.

The Welcome to Weston Walk will show how deep roots can enrich the present while still leaving room for the future. The stops involve a youth drop in, the Weston Heritage Conservation District, a modern Doctor’s clinic in a former Post Office, a multifaceted Artscape project, the evolution of Grand Trunk train station to one for the GO train and UP Express and the Historical Society Archives!

The Weston walk will be May 6 at 10 am, and will start in the GO Station parking lot. It should last about an hour.

Mt Dennis Jane’s Walk

Ever-awesome Simon Chamberlain will be leading a Jane’s Walk through Mount Dennis this weekend. The tour promises “Boom and Bust. Canals, Masons, Booze, Railroads, Disease, Flooding” (or historical facsimiles thereof).

The walk will begin at 1 pm on Saturday, May 2 at the Portage Trail School.

JW

Jane’s Walk this Saturday May 3rd.

Jane's Walk2014-GB

On Saturday, May 3rd at 5:30 pm, a ‘Jane’s Walk’ will feature the Humber Trail between Lions Park and the weir in Raymore Park. To commemorate the upcoming 60th anniversary of Hurricane Hazel this year, the emphasis will be on the storm, its effects and after-effects on the environment both natural and human. There is no charge for this event.

Some of the stops along the way will be:

Stop 1: Lawrence Avenue Bridge

The effects of Hurricane Hazel and its deluge of water on the bridge and surroundings.

Stop 2: Lion’s Park / Weston Fairground

Stop 3: Raymore Foot Bridge

The history of the footbridge that once existed at this point and its current successor.

Stop 4: Raymore Drive (across bridge)

The ground where 36 people lost their lives; the role of the old bridge. View traces of the settlement that was destroyed.

Stop 5: Raymore Park

The aftermath of Hazel and the organization set up to acquire and manage flood plain land.

Stop 6: Raymore Park dam

The fish ladder and migrating trout. The future of weirs along the Humber.

Stop 7: Chapman Valley Park / Humber Creek

The flooding that occurred at the top of this creek on July 8 2013, and the impact development has had on rivers across the city

Stop 8:

Urban river valleys, the Greenbelt, and the upcoming staff report and vote in city council to add the Humber, Don, and Etobicoke Creek to the Greenbelt.

  • Option 1: Retrace our steps along the Humber path,
  • Option 2: walk through the streets, past the wooden church at Scarlett and Kingdom, down Raymore Drive, crossing back over Raymore bridge and ending back up at Lion’s Park.

Walk Leaders:

Mary Louise Ashbourne (Weston Historical Society)
Gaspar Horvath (TRCA)
Roy Murray (Humber Watershed Alliance)
Shelley Petrie (Friends of the Greenbelt)
Michael Cook (Lost Rivers)

Meeting point: Car park at Lawrence Avenue and Little Avenue (Cruickshank Park) at 5:30pm.

Carrying Place plaque unveiled.

Alongside the busy traffic on Weston Road, a ceremony was held by the Weston Historical Society (WHS) Saturday to dedicate a plaque commemorating the European discovery of the Carrying Place Trail. The plaque, a brainchild of WHS, was partly funded by a grant of $1000 from Metrolinx.

The trail was a route that followed the eastern banks of the Humber River used by Aboriginal people between Toronto and Lake Simcoe. The plaque, on the corner of Weston Road and Little Avenue is right on the original trail and commemorates Weston’s place on the trail as well as the countless generations of Aboriginal people who lived here before being displaced by European settlement. Elder Garry Sault of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nations along with Carolyn King, co-chair of the New Credit First Nations Cultural Committee led a traditional Aboriginal blessing with smudging and drumming and later spoke about the history of the natives who lived in the area.

Elder Garry Sault of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nations leads a traditional Aboriginal blessing with smudging and drumming.
Elder Garry Sault of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nations.

Mary Louise Ashborne spoke of the vast amounts of wildlife that populated the area until made extinct (e.g. passenger pigeon) or decimated by hunting or pollution (e.g. Atlantic salmon). Several Weston VIPs were in attendance – almost outnumbering the public who chose to attend.

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L to R, facing camera, Councillor Frances Nunziata, BIA Chair Massum Hossain, Suri Weinberg-Linsky, Weston Historical Society President, Mary Louise Ashborne, MPP Laura Albanese, MP Mike Sullivan.
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L to R, Humber River Guardian Madeleine McDowell, Cherri Hurst (WHS), Carolyn King, Elder Garry Sault.

Mike Sullivan spoke about his private-members bill to restore protection to the Humber, designated a Heritage River in 1999. He is concerned that oil pipelines that cross the Humber may more easily spill their contents into the river thanks to recent federal legislation that loosened environmental protection for the river.

The unveiling was followed by a Jane’s Walk hosted by the WHS, south along the Humber pointing out places of historical interest along the way.