Job posting: herding cats at Weston Farmers Market.

A cat at a farmers market reclining in a basket of catnip.
From i.pinimg.com.

Weston’s BIA has a couple of jobs advertised on its site and one is that of Manager of the Farmers Market. Keeping the lid on this (quite rightly) feisty and vocal group of traders will be a tough one so the successful applicant had better start training asap. Here’s the job posting:

Submission Deadline: Friday, Feb 23, 2018

Start Date: Mon, April 30, 2018

Job Type: Contract

CompensationCommensurate with Experience

 

Job Description:

The Market Manager is responsible for the coordination of the weekly, Saturday morning, market as well as the day to day operations throughout the week.  The Market Manager works closely with the Board of Directors of the Weston BIA (the owners of the market) to carry out their responsibilities and is provided support by them as needed. The market is held outdoors and operates from the second Saturday in May to the last Saturday in October from 7.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. and the position is renegotiated at that time.

 

Responsibilities:

  • Coordinate the weekly Market on Saturdays, including set-up and take down, vendor placement and stall fee collections.
  • Manage vendors, including recruitment and retention, mail out of vendor contracts; resolve any disputes or concerns among vendors and/or customers, and ensuring vendor compliance to Market Rules and Regulations and health regulations.
  • Attend bi-monthly board meetings to provide market updates and act as the liaison between vendors and the board (presenting written comments and/or complaints to be addressed).
  • Manage Market communications, including responding to market inquiries (e.g. e-mail and phone calls) and media requests in a timely manner.
  • Market Promotion including signeage, posters, advertisements in the local newspaper and social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram).Events
  • Coordinate special events, activities and/or programs at the market (e.g. official opening day celebrations, Corn Roast, Harvest/Halloween, kid’s activities, music and other entertainment.

     Skills and Qualifications Required:

  • Strong leadership, and interpersonal skills and the ability to work with multiple stakeholders in a professional manner.
  • Excellent time management and organizational skills.
  • Experience and knowledge in food service management, food safety and regulatory requirements for food sales at Temporary Food Markets is an asset.
  • Experience working with a volunteer board.
  • Previous Farmers’ Market Management experience, although not a pre-requisite, would be considered an asset.
  • Knowledge of the Weston community and key stakeholders preferred.
  • Good working knowledge of social media advertising, flyer and content for advertisements in newspapers and other.

 

Submit your Application and Cover letter to the Board of Management of the Weston BIA at: admin@westonvillagebia.com or mail to: 4 John Street Unit 3, Toronto, Ontario, M9N 1J3 by Friday, Feb 23rd at 5.00 p.m.

 

  • Only candidates chosen for an interview will be contacted.

WTFuel cell technology?

Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca announcing interest in fuel cell technology in June 2017.
From urbantoronto.ca

The Kitchener GO Line that runs through Weston / Mount Dennis will eventually be electrified. The Ontario Government recently announced through Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca that it would be spending ‘up to $200,000’ to study  alternatives to GO train electrification. A Mississauga company, Hydrogenics has managed to persuade the Minister that fuel cells may be the way to go instead of using overhead wires and electric trains.

How would it work? Hydrogen gas (yes, the gas used in the Hindenburg airship) would be produced by applying an electric current to water in a process known as electrolysis. The process is touted as green but unfortunately, electrolysis is notoriously inefficient so hydrogen produced for large projects such as a fleet of trains is manufactured from fossil fuels such as oil or natural gas – releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide and therefore not green at all.

Once hydrogen is made, problems continue. Storing it is hard. It must be compressed, cooled to a liquid or stored chemically – all of which are costly in terms of energy. Once stored, it must be transported to the trains.

The trains then would generate electricity from the hydrogen through the use of an on-board fuel cell of the type made by Hydrogenics. That means they would have a fuel cell electricity generator and a propulsion unit. Electric trains draw their current from overhead wires and only need a propulsion unit.

Surprisingly, adding to the negatives, a litre of gasoline contains about 64% more hydrogen than pure liquid hydrogen itself – yes, the hydrogen that was probably extracted at great cost from gasoline or diesel fuel.

Anyone who has been to Europe or ridden on Amtrak would know that electric trains there use overhead wires (called catenaries – in use since 1889) to supply power. The Eglinton Crosstown line opening in 2021 will use catenaries. It’s the current state of the art.

For some reason, either Mr. Del Duca wants to throw a $200,000 present to a company in the Liberal riding of Mississauga – Brampton South or he’s been completely misled about basic physics. Either scenario makes one wonder about the minister’s competence.

This video from Elon Musk sums up the inefficiencies and difficulties involved in getting hydrogen fuel cell technology to work. Yes, Mr. Musk has an axe to grind (battery technology) but his points are valid.

On the Ministry of Transportation’s GO Transit site, fuel cell technology is touted as electrification since the fuel cells generate electricity that drives the trains. If that’s the case, diesel trains can also be called electric since diesel engines generate electricity that drives the trains. Furthermore, since fuel cells are likely to need fossil fuels to provide the hydrogen, maybe we should call a conversion to fuel cell technology, fossilization.

Province cuts GO/UPX – TTC transfer cost.

An older model Presto Card and reader.

Many people are taking advantage of the rapid link to downtown that we enjoy here in Weston. It’s only 6 minutes to Bloor station and 14 minutes to Union from where TTC connections can be made. Some people find the combined cost of the GO/UP Express and the TTC too high and have felt that a discount should be offered. The Liberals will announce today that people who use a Presto Card to pay for fares will soon get a break when using both transit modes.

For example, people taking the GO train or UP Express will get a $1.50 discount on a TTC ticket when a Presto Card is used. Similarly, in the reverse direction a GO or UP Express ticket will be discounted $1.50 for those transferring from the TTC. The fare subsidy is designed to encourage more people to leave their cars at home and will save commuters up to $720 annually.

The new fare system will come into effect in December and is similar to  (but more generous) than those offered in other municipalities.

If you thought the UPX was crowded before…

Read more in this Star article here.

Weston Station to get a new platform.

Work has started on a fourth passenger track that will run through Weston. The track bed is already in place and rail will be put down between Nickel and the 427 over the next few weeks. This fourth track will be for GO only and a new low level platform will be built at Weston Station. This fourth track will allow for faster and more frequent passenger service along the Kitchener line.

The single GO track back in October 2013

UP Express ridership zooms 20%

Anyone who has travelled on the UP Express recently will know that since fares were reduced, the train has been wildly popular; not only with airline passengers but also with commuters and people moving between the stations of Pearson, Weston, Bloor and Union.

Fares dropped to their current levels in March 2016 and by July of that year, monthly ridership had increased from a low of 60,000 in February 2016 to about 250,000. Metrolinx spokesperson Anne Marie Aikins tweeted today that in July 2017, ridership was over 300,000 for that month. While this might be a reflection of tourist numbers, it’s still a good sign and a great perk of living in Weston.

 

GTA Transit Planning Revealed.

From bms.co.in

The latest news of how transit gets built in this area comes as no surprise to most people in the GTA.  In the latest outrage, straight from the manual of how to operate a corrupt government, Provincial Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca possibly acting in a craven bid to keep his own seat, seems to have pressured Metrolinx into approving two unnecessary GO stations. One in his riding and another $25 million station which was (literally) forged into existence, in order to satisfy (Rob Ford in sheep’s clothing) Mayor Tory’s ill-conceived SmartTrack needs. With a wink and a nod to voters in next June’s election, Del Duca could point to the $100 million GO station as a reason to re-elect him. One might speculate that the March resignation of Bruce McCuaig was a reaction to this nonsense, knowing that the truth would eventually come out.

This chart illustrates the weekly passenger loads on TTC lines and routes. The downtown relief line would serve four times as many people as a Scarborough Subway. Click to enlarge. From reliefline.ca

The $3.35 billion, one-stop Scarborough Subway is another example of how transit planning is perverted by politicians for their own re-election purposes. Torontonians will be paying for that white elephant for the next 50 years while knowing that a much better LRT was already planned and paid for. Line 1 is overcrowded with 731,000 passengers weekly. Line 3 has only 40,000. In the meantime, politicians like Glenn de Bearemaeker and John Tory stick to the same nonsense that Scarborough deserves a subway. Even our own councillor, Frances Nunziata supports this obscenity presumably because she wants to Tory to keep her on as Council Speaker.

Closer to home, the UP Express was originally designed to be built privately and run non-stop to the airport. It was going to cost taxpayers nothing while barreling at high speed through our neighbourhood. Luckily the community got involved in the form of the people of Weston and the Clean Train Coalition. As a result of community pressure, Weston got its own station and a tunnel was built to put some of the line below grade. In spite of common sense, we’re still stuck with the CP tracks not going in the tunnel with the other lines, broken links between streets like John Street and a sell-off of the old GO parking lot for development without any community input. On the plus side, we now have an inexpensive, quick and frequent train to the airport and downtown but in fairness, no politician planned this; it was forced on them by community pressure.

Sadly, most politicians will do whatever they need to do in order to get elected. Public vigilance and pressure is the only answer. Being well informed and vocal is in every citizen’s best interest.

From Smart Citizen Engagement – Power to Sense: Dr Mazlan Abbas. Keynote Presentation at Asia Pacific Smart City Forum 2016

There is an old saying that war is too important to be left to the generals. Along the same lines, governing is too important to be left to politicians. Demanding and participating in community consultation events has never been more important. Especially since there is about to be a huge surge in redevelopment in Weston. Chief Planner Jennifer Keesmaat’s resignation on Monday will only serve to stress the importance of informed citizen input.

What’s happening to Weston Station?

In the two years that Weston UP Express Station has been open, a sharp deterioration in landscaping and service has occurred. The station provides a vital first impression for people passing through Weston and it’s beginning to look tired. If this is an attempt to save money since fares were lowered, it’s definitely a false economy and reflects badly on our community.

The station just before it opened in June 2015.
Dead trees and weeds blight Weston Station in 2017
Looking towards the Lawrence footbridge in 2015.
Empty planters in 2017.
Weston Station bike racks 2017.

Are vandals removing plants from flower beds? They certainly aren’t planting the weeds.

One more thing. The station was once open while trains were running but is now locked up tight between 10:30 am and 3:30 pm and closed altogether on weekends. This is a reduction in service and Weston deserves better. People with mobility concerns needing to use the elevator may think they are out of luck if trains are running and the station is closed. Surely a way could be found to keep the station open. At one time, there was talk of a coffee shop in the station. What happened to that idea?

Go away.

The other middle stop along the line, Bloor Station is open during these same hours and on weekends although counter service follows similar hours as in the image above.

Why is Weston treated this badly? Presumably because Metrolinx thinks that nobody cares. Is that true? Metrolinx and our local representatives need to know that this is wrong. The reason we have a station is because people let politicians know that it was important. If Metrolinx is allowed to neglect the station to the point where people stop using it, that will put it in danger of closing.

Perhaps that’s the plan.

Interim CEO, John Jensen, Metrolinx’s former chief capital officer needs to know about this. He could fix this tomorrow.

Metrolinx Web Feedback here. Phone: 416-869-3300

Councillor Frances Nunziata: Phone: 416-392-4091

MPP Laura Albanese: Phone: 416-243-7984

MP Ahmed Hussen: Phone: 416-656-2526

Update: Scott Money from Metrolinx says,

“Thank you for bringing forward your concerns about the landscaping at Weston GO station. Our operations team is looking into this right away and will fix any landscaping issues at the station as soon as possible.

The operating hours at Weston Go station have remained consistent since the station opened.”

I have asked Scott why there is a difference in treatment between the Weston and Bloor stations and will publish the response when it arrives.