TPS donates 2000 lbs of food

12 Division police donated 2000 pounds of food to local organizations.

In the news release, the police said,

“It was brought to our attention that a lot of families were short of food because of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Constable Brandon Mak. “We brought this back to the station and drew up a plan to start an in-house food drive.”…

“We wanted to have some friendly and healthy competition while collecting non-perishable food for a good cause,” said Mak. “About a month in, we had about 1,000 pounds of food that we donated to four groups in the Division.

Image from the TPS

On May 4, the police donated another 1000 pounds of food, including to the Weston King Neighbourhood Centre.

Nunziata opposes defunding the police

Frances Nunziata opposes defunding the policethe international movement to reduce police budgets and redirect the money to other social programs. Her position is nuanced, though: she does believe “there are concrete ways in which the City can improve on emergency responses and replace armed police officers with mobile, community-based crisis programs to de-escalate and triage non-criminal incidents”. She also says that she supports funding for social programs as alternatives to the criminal justice system.

Nunziata says she will oppose a City Council motion that would cut the police’s $1.22 billion budget by 10%.

In an email forwarded to me, she said:

Our society is coming to a touchstone moment for a necessary shift in the way we approach racial injustice, policing, and crisis response. I have been genuinely inspired by the spirited dedication and motivation I am seeing and hearing from residents – and especially youth – across our city. This is a time to express emotions, have what are often considered those uncomfortable conversations, and address what comes out of these conversations in engaged, thoughtful and effective ways.

I do not support the motion to defund the Toronto Police Service by ten percent. While I appreciate the emotion behind it, I do not agree with the recommendations.

There is undoubtedly a need to engage in the conversation and indeed take action on the issues and injustices that are being discussed, but I do not believe that this motion is the way forward.

I wholeheartedly support allocating funding for community-led alternatives to policing and the criminal justice system, anti-racism education, programs identified in the Toronto Youth Equity Strategy, childcare, affordable housing, Tenants Defence Fund and food security.

There are still a number of days before City Council and I am listening to all sides of the conversation.

At the Toronto Police Services Board meeting on June 19th, a Motion by Board Member Uppala Chandrasekera was put forward with recommendations for the Board related to current events. The Board referred the report back to the Chair to allow time to engage in broad public consultation on it. I look forward to hearing these discussions.

I do believe that there are concrete ways in which the City can improve on emergency responses and replace armed police officers with mobile, community-based crisis programs to de-escalate and triage non-criminal incidents involving mental health, addictions and homeless individuals. I also believe that these solutions should be decided in consultation with Black, Indigenous and People of Colour community-led organizations and mental health, restorative justice and legal experts.

 

Who was the man killed by police?

The Toronto Star has an article about the mystery of the homeless man killed by police in Weston last year. It was the second time he had been shot by police in Weston, both times after threatening them with a butcher knife.

The police have little idea who he was.

 

No one knew John Doe.

Not his real name, not his birthday, not where he came from. More than a year after Doe ambushed Toronto police officers with a kitchen knife in a dusty rail corridor in North York, leading one of them to fatally shoot him, all investigators can say is that he was a sex offender with a violent past.

Developers, start your engines.

Toronto’s new(ish) Police Chief Mark Saunders came to Weston / Mount Dennis on Tuesday with Mayor Tory to gauge community response to the re-alignment of police division boundaries along with the possible closure of 12 Division’s headquarters scheduled for 2018. (according to CP24)

In fact, according to the Interim Report approved at July’s Police Board meeting, 12 Division (along with several others) will disappear as it becomes amalgamated. How that process will work is rather vague.

The boundaries of 12 Division.
The current boundaries of Toronto Police’s 12 Division.

Here’s a look (below) at the affected Toronto police divisions according to CP24.

A look at the future of Toronto's police divisions.
Original map adapted by Roy Murray.

Saunders was no doubt hired with the understanding that the billion dollar police budget had to be trimmed, but like his predecessors has dragged his heels. John Tory, mayor of one of the lowest taxed cities in the country is currently asking for a 2.6% across the board budget cut to every city department so he can bring in ‘an at or below inflation’ tax increase.

It’s well known that when City budget cuts come, they disproportionally affect the poor along with areas where large numbers of poor people live. User fees go up, services get slashed and the TTC is ordered to cut back on crowded suburban routes. Mayor Tory is simply another slash and burn, subway loving member of Ford nation albeit with a better grip on P.R. (Ignore the bazillion acre park across the rail lands; it’s a distraction). The Mayor and his rich friends don’t like paying property taxes on their mansions and so the poor must bear the burden.

A satellite view of 12 Division HQ.
A satellite view of 12 Division HQ.

What’s a police chief to do? Learn from the fine example set by politicians and look for savings from people who don’t make as much of a fuss. The police station currently occupied by 12 Division is on a large piece of real estate with excellent highway connections. Wouldn’t it be a great place for a high rise apartment building or two? It even has enough room for parking. Dress the sale up as a ‘modernization of police services’ and police ‘becoming more accessible’ and you have the makings of a fine sales job.

Developers must be salivating at prospect of owning the site. Toronto City Council would smooth all hurdles out of the way and the sale of police assets would trim the Chief’s bloated budget for now while being framed as greater contact with the community. Win Win Win!

Some key words come in the Chief’s Interim Report executive summary.

In the months leading up to our final report, we will continue to look for responsible measures that can yield additional reductions, savings, and real estate returns.

and more tellingly, The full interim report says this:

Through the redesign of boundaries and facilities, we have identified up to $72 million in real estate that could be returned to the City of Toronto.

As we conduct the next phase of our work we will look for other similar opportunities.

A close-up of the property. Lots of room for a high rise and it even has parking. Photo from Google Earth.
A close-up of the property. Lots of room for a high rise, great road connections and it even has ample parking. Photo from Google Earth.

Given past knowledge of previous public asset sales, developers are no doubt lining up with proposals and part of the deal will have to include a crumb or two for the community.

Make no mistake, without a strong community response, 12 Division Headquarters will be sold.

It may already be too late.

Will this be a bad thing? Who knows. Tim Hortons across the street from the station will certainly suffer.

If the goal truly is to provide more contact with the community, then it may not be the end of the world although we don’t know how that will be achieved. Several storefront locations (if implemented) might be a better alternative than a large fortress of a building, but local residents will have to fight long and hard for these and we don’t even know what exactly is planned since the report is merely ‘interim’. There’s certainly no shortage of empty storefronts in Weston / Mount Dennis. A police presence might revitalize our communities. (Where will all those cruisers go?)

It might be a good idea for Chief Saunders and the Mayor to clarify how the consolidation process will take place and what steps will be taken to ensure that community assets are not being turned over to the private sector simply to protect property owners from a long needed tax increase.

People also need to feel confident that this is not a back of the napkin job like the Mayor’s fatuous SmartTrack plans and that we aren’t blundering into a chaotic future.

Leonard Fullerton; a wasted life.

In the Toronto Star today is an excellent article about the life and death of local resident Leonard Fullerton; shot dead (an unsolved crime) in October at the age of 26. His life was an unfortunate series of mis-steps from which he was unable to recover. The article raises some interesting questions about the role of schools and police in dealing with behaviour, petty crime and the uneven treatment of young black men. No doubt this young man’s parents weren’t perfect – whose are? No doubt he was into petty crime and made mistakes. How many adults can look back and say that their youth was blemish free? The point is that a young white man from Rosedale or Forest Hill would have probably been given a second chance by the school system and the police. Without such support, and with a criminal record, young black men like Leonard Fullerton have no means of supporting themselves and thus can see little alternative to a life of petty (or worse) crime.

Toronto Star article: How a young Toronto black man got tagged as trouble

 

Police make major arrest in Weston murders

Police made a spectacular arrest today of Mark Garfield Moore. The charges against this man read like a crime wave rather than one individual’s shocking deeds. He is accused of four murders around the city, including those of Courthney Facey and Mike James, who were murdered outside 1798 Weston Road last September 29. In addition there are many firearms-related charges.

All of the alleged offences took place in the relatively short timeframe between June and November of 2010. A number of related arrests have been made in what appears to be a major victory for the task force (Project Summit) specifically set up by Toronto Police to solve these cases. According to police, more arrests are forthcoming.

Det. Sgt Hank Idsinga told the CBC

Facey and James were gunned down for “no rhyme or reason,”

“Mr. Moore, allegedly, for unknown reasons, pulled up to them in his vehicle and shot and killed them.”

Facey, James and Spence had never had any contact with police and were not involved in any criminal activity.

The accused has another connection to Weston: his brother, Andre Moore, was suspected of shooting a police officer, Anthony Macias, outside the same apartment buildings at 1798 Weston Rd in 2001, according to the Globe and Mail. Andre Moore was shot dead three years ago. Macias, the police officer, was seriously injured.

Mark Moore was shot in the face in 2001 and this can be seen in his aspiring rapper video where he tellingly shows off large amounts of cash and ‘bling’. Moore was not from Weston; he committed most of his crimes in Scarborough, and he was born and raised there.

Weston Losing Its Split Personality

As a result of Toronto Police Service boundary changes, from Monday, September 26 Weston will no longer be split into two police divisions. 12 Division’s new northern boundary will now be Highway 401. This makes a lot of sense as Weston will no longer straddle two jurisdictions. This should lead to better coordination of effort north and south of the old boundary on Lawrence Avenue West. 12 Division’s southern boundary also moves north and will now be along St Clair rather than the CP line. Read the press release here.