Good news for Pan Am Trail cyclists.

The Pan Am Path passes through Weston, albeit grudgingly. Cyclists wishing to take the trail north of Cruickshank Park are forced to take a steep climb up the steps to the intersection of Weston and St. Phillips roads. In order to re-join the trail, a dangerous stretch of Weston Road must be traversed safely – from personal experience, this is no easy picnic.

The good news is that the multi use trail will have some new intersections as it crosses the Humber heading towards Dundas. Scarlett Road will be getting bike lanes along that stretch.

Looking south from Scarlett Rd and St Clair Ave W
The proposed new and improved intersection at Scarlett and Dundas.

The driving force for this comes from surveys and a public meeting held in late 2017 to discuss issues around the upgrading of the intersection at Scarlett and Dundas. Plans are to widen the space under the tracks and lower Scarlett to end the traffic bottleneck and height restrictions at that location. At the public meeting, among other things, the need for separated bike lanes was expressed. Plans were modified over the past year to include these as seen in the map and cross-section below.

Map of bike lane (cycle track) along Scarlett Road from the Humber River to just north St. Clair Avenue at Bernice Crescent. Options for cycling connections to Scarlett Road being considered for the future include Eileen Avenue to Pritchard Avenue or Eileen Avenue to Corbett Avenue.

A meeting to discuss the latest plans will be held early next week.

Date: Monday, April 29, 2019
Time: Drop in 6:30 to 9 p.m.. Presentation at 7 p.m.
Location: Lambton Park Community School, 50 Bernice Cres., Wheelchair accessible.

This meeting was requested by local Councillor Frances Nunziata who will be in attendance alongside Councillor Gord Perks.

For more details, click here.

Weston Treasures – Toronto Bell Cote.

The former St. Matthias church newly renovated.
The former St. Matthias church newly renovated.

There is a small white church on Scarlett Road (in Greater Metropolitan Weston) that featured large in the aftermath of Hurricane Hazel. Then named St. Matthias Anglican, (the congregation relocated in 1957) it became a centre for community donations to assist victims of the disaster that killed and rendered homeless many people in the area. Even without that role, it has a fascinating history having been built in Malton in 1895 and was moved to its current location on Scarlett Road in 1923. Eighty years later, in 2003, the site was given Hertitage Site designation by the city thanks to the hard work of local historical societies. An application to have the site redeveloped as a townhouse complex came in 2004 but the City and then the OMB said no (demonstrating the worth of a heritage designation).

In 2010, current owners, the Sukyo Mahikari organization tried to have it demolished, justifying demolition with a report which stated that:

  • the building has fallen into disuse and disrepair, it has been neglected and is in a rapid state of deterioration
  • the foundation walls are on the verge of collapse, and there is an immense amount of energy loss given the original construction materials and methods
  • The building is a major eyesore in the community
  • When the application was made for heritage designation, critical structural and material analysis were not completed which would have revealed unsafe conditions
  • In order to maintain and rehabilitate the current building, the cost would be overwhelming

Details of its condition can be found here.

City planners recommended against demolition, and mercifully, Etobicoke York Council unanimously voted against the application. The group was told by then Councillor Doug Hoiyday to have a re-think and look around for grant money which they did – very successfully – and the rest is history so to speak. The costly renovation that has been done is very sympathetic and has ensured many more years of existence for the 120 year-old building and the preservation of a local landmark. The installation of a geothermal heating and cooling system will ensure low running costs for many years to come.

The Sukyo Mahikari organization has only one location in Toronto and this is it.

The sympathetic addition can be seen on the right.
The sympathetic addition can be seen on the right.

The church is one of 16 buildings competing for a Heritage Toronto Architecture award in the category of projects which “restore or adapt buildings or structures that have been in existence for 40 years or more, or are included on the City of Toronto’s Inventory of Heritage Properties.”

The church is still working on further restoration and a major project will be to replace the bell that went missing a few years ago.

If readers would like to have a tour, one may be arranged by phoning 647-748-2683.