Weston and Lawrence electrical work.

Weston and Lawrence electrical work.

Weston and Lawrence is being dug up again; this time it’s electrical work to upgrade power for the upcoming electrification of GO train service.

According to Toronto Hydro, “Please be advised that Toronto Hydro is planning to rebuild and relocate the overhead and underground electrical system in the community in preparation for the GO Expansion Electrification program.” The timeline is a vague June-July 2020.

Thanks to Covid-19, the restriction to one lane of traffic along both routes isn’t causing major upheavals.

I wonder if workers have discovered any artifacts at this (for Toronto) relatively ancient intersection.

29 storeys? You ain’t seen nothing yet.

People were upset when 22 John asked to build a 29-storey tower. People were upset when the Greenlands developers asked to build two 29-storey towers.

Now, the developers of 1821 Weston have asked to build a 36-storey tower that resembles, well, I leave it to you to decide, but the little black moustache at base doesn’t make me think the tower is a nose.

From the application

1821 Weston is just south of Lawrence on the east side. The developers would like to build 454 condominiums with insufficient parking.

location
From Google Maps

Another development is in the works on the Scotiabank lot, just north of there, at 1871 Weston, and a third is being planned just down the street at 1695 Weston.

Toronto’s dangerous roads strike locally.

Vision Zero? – Sometimes it seems like Zero Vision in car-centric Toronto.

Terrible news on Friday afternoon: yet another pedestrian was mowed down by someone driving a vehicle near Weston Road and Lawrence. According to cbc.ca, the woman, in her 20s was in serious condition but expected to survive.

Toronto’s drivers are killing people at the rate of one a week. At this rate, another 55 Torontonians will die on our streets by year’s end.

While the Mayor and Council claim to be concerned about this, they are doing little about the deaths and injuries. For example, there are only 77 red light cameras in the whole of Toronto and only one remotely close to our area (at Keele and Lawrence). This in a city with 2300 traffic lights. Incidentally, why do we warn drivers about these cameras?

In a similar vein, Mayor Tory and his hand-selected Public Works Committee are fighting the insertion of bike lanes and wider sidewalks on Yonge near Mel Lastman Square, preferring the current 6-lane highway.

Councillors on the committee are :

Read the CBC article on the collision here.

We are all pedestrians.

Update: Hans Havermann has corrected my erroneous numbers. Read about it here.

Traffic calming on Hickory Tree Road to be debated

Now here’s a question: should the city break the rules when a small and vocal minority wants something?

Should it break the rules if nobody objects? What if the small and vocal minority is right?

On the one hand, your correspondent detests special pleading. On the other hand, 95% of respondents on Hickory Tree Road want speed humps. On the other other hand, only 15% of the surveyed voters responded, far short of the 50%+1 the city requires. But on the other other other hand, speed humps are fantastic things, a delight to children, pets, pedestrians, park-users and bicyclists everywhere, and an irritation to planet-killing and neighbourhood-destroying eroto-autocists, who probably take Hickory Tree Road as a shortcut past the busy intersection at Weston and Lawrence.

Etobicoke York Community Council will have to decide on the 13th of January. Ah, screw democracy—the majority of the minority should win.

Hickory Tree

The community council will also decide whether an all-way stop should be installed at Walwyn and Limerick, even though there is not nearly enough traffic to warrant one.

walwyn and limerick